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Indiana Election Division

Election Division > Statistics and Maps > 2000 Indiana Voter Information Guide 2000 Indiana Voter Information Guide

Primary Election Day
May 2, 2000

General Election Day
November 7, 2000

Polls are open from 6 AM to 6 PM
local prevailing time.

2000 Primary Election

The major parties nominate candidates for the
following offices at the 2000 Indiana Primary
Election on May 2, 2000:
  • Candidates for President to be nominated at national party conventions.
  • United States Senator
  • All 10 United States Representatives
  • Governor and Lieutenant Governor of Indiana
  • Indiana State Senators: Districts 2, 3, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, 13, 16, 18, 20, 24, 28, 30, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 40, 42, 44, 50
  • All 100 State Representatives
  • Judges of circuit, superior, probate and county courts in several counties.
  • Clerks of the circuit courts in several counties.
  • County Auditor, County Recorder, County Treasurer, County Coroner, County Surveyor, County Assessor, County Commissioner, and County Council Member in several counties.
  • Town council members, town clerk-treasurers, and town judges in certain towns which have chosen to stagger terms for town council members, or to elect all town officials during a general election year.
Several jurisdictions will also elect non-partisan school board members at the primary election.
Some local public questions may be placed on the ballot in certain counties.

Voter Registration

The deadline to register to vote in the Primary Election is April 3, 2000. The deadline to register to vote in the General Election is October 9, 2000. Mail-in voter registration applications must be postmarked on or before April 3 to be eligible to vote in the Primary; mail-in applications must be postmarked on or before October 9 in order to be eligible to vote in the General Election.

If you are unsure of whether or not you are registered or whether your registration application was approved, contact the county voter registration office in your county of residence.

Where to register to vote:

You may register in person at your county voter registration office (In many counties, this is also your county circuit court clerk's office.) If you need to pick up a mail-in voter registration application, visit your local license branch, public library, township trustee or city/town clerk-treasurer's office. You may also register to vote while applying for or renewing your driver's license, or updating your address. Your local public assistance, disability, or unemployment compensation office will also make voter registration available to you if you apply for or renew services, or change your address.

How to register to vote:

To register to vote in Indiana, you must complete a voter registration application. You must provide your name, residential address, birth date and signature (indicating that you meet the voter registration requirements in Indiana). You will also be asked for optional information, including your phone number and social security number.

How to update your voter registration address:

To protect your right to vote, you must notify the county voter registration office where you now live that you wish to be registered at your new address. Simply fill out a mail-in voter registration application and return it to your county voter registration office or the Indiana Election Division before the registration deadline. Please include your old registration address on your voter registration application.

Updating your voter registration address after the deadline:

In some cases, you may still be able to vote if you qualify for a special transfer procedure by filling out a "VRG-12" form. Contact your county voter registration office for more information. Even if you cannot vote in this election because you missed the deadline, you can still apply to vote in future elections.

Updating your voter registration address when you've moved after the deadline:

You may still be able to vote at the precinct where you used to live by filling out a "VRG-4" form. Contact your county voter registration office for more information.

Voting Procedures

Where to vote:

If you are unsure about where your polling place is located, call your county election board (usually at your county circuit court clerk's office). If you move after the voter registration deadline, please call your county election board to find out where you should vote.

How to vote at the polls:

Instructions on how to cast your ballot will be provided at your polling place, and explained to you by your polling place's poll workers.

Voting assistance:

If you need assistance in voting, you may choose someone to help you (other than your employer or union officer) or two poll workers (one of each major political party) will be available to assist you. No one who assists you may disclose any information about how you voted.

2000 General Election

The following offices will be on the ballot for the
2000 Indiana General Election on November 7,
2000:

  • Electors for President and Vice-President of The United States.
  • United States Senator
  • All 10 United States Representatives
  • Governor and Lieutenant Governor of Indiana
  • Attorney General
  • Superintendent of Public Instruction
  • Indiana State Senators: Districts 2, 3, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, 13, 16, 18, 20, 24, 28, 30, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 40, 42, 44, 50
  • All 100 State Representatives
  • Judges of circuit, superior, and county courts in several counties.
  • Clerks of the circuit courts in several counties.
  • County Auditor, County Recorder, County Treasurer, County Coroner, County Surveyor, County Assessor, County Commissioner, and County Council Member in several counties.
  • Town council members, town clerk-treasurers, and town judges in certain towns which have chosen to stagger terms for town council members, or tp elect all town officials during a general election year.
  • Voters will vote on the ratification of at least one proposed state constitutional amendment, the retention of state appellate judges or local judges, and on any local public question placed on the ballot in accordance with state law.

Voter Eligibility

You are qualified to vote in the 2000 Primary and General Elections if you:

  • are a citizen of the United States.
  • are at least 18 years old on or before November 7, 2000. (If you are not 18 years old by May 2, but turn 18 before November 7, you may vote in the Primary Election to nominate General Election candidates. Note: you may not vote for candidates elected or issues decided at the Primary Election.)
  • reside in your precinct at least 29 days before the election in which you will be voting.
  • are not currently in prison after being convicted of a crime.
  • Apply to register to vote at least 29 days before the election in which you will be voting, and your application is approved.

Polling Place Accessibility

Resources available for disabled voters:

State law requests that polling locations be accessible to disabled and elderly voters. The Indiana Election Division requests that each precinct make the following items available to voters:

  • magnifiers for visually impaired voters,
  • tape to hold ballots in place for voters unable to hold them, and
  • chairs for voters unable to stand for extended periods of time.
Absentee Voting

Absentee voting requirements:

You may vote by absentee ballot in Indiana if you are a registered voter of the precinct where you reside, and you:

  • will be absent from your county of residence on Election Day.
  • are an election official.
  • are confined on Election Day due to illness or injury.
  • have disabilities.
  • are 65 years of age or older.
  • are a caretaker of an individual(s) confined to a private residence due to illness or injury.
  • are scheduled to work for the entire twelve hours that the poll is open (6 am - 6 pm).

Absentee Voting Procedures

How to vote absentee in your county clerk's office:

If you are eligible to vote absentee, you may vote in your county clerk's office before Election Day. First, you must complete an absentee ballot application and return it to your county election board (usually in the clerk's office) by noon on the day before the election. Second, you must vote at your county clerk's office. Absentee voting in the clerk's office begins 29 days before the election, and will be available at least two Saturdays before Election Day.

How to vote absentee by mail:

If you are eligible to vote absentee, you may vote by mail. First, you must complete an absentee ballot application and return it to your county election board (at the clerk's office). Applications from most voters must be received, whether submitted by mail or FAX, at least eight days before Election Day. (If you live in Marion County, are a confined voter, a voter caring for a confined individual, a military voter, or an overseas voter, there are special requirements that apply. Please contact your county election board or county clerk for more detailed information.)

When the county election board receives your application for a mail-in absentee ballot, they will process it and, if the application is approved, mail you an absentee ballot for the upcoming election. Your completed ballot may be returned by mail to the county election board. Your ballot may also be hand delivered by yourself, a member of your household, or your attorney in fact. Ballots must be received by the county election board, at the clerk's office, in time to be processed for the election.

This pamphlet contains basic, general information concerning the election process.
Where your legal rights are concerned, do not rely on this pamphlet. Instead, review the
law yourself or consult an attorney

Find us on the web at:
http://www.in.gov/sos/elections


For more information on registering to vote, call your county clerk or voter registration board (under voter registration in the government section of the white pages of your phone book).

For more information on absentee voting in your clerks office, call your county circuit court clerk or county election board.