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A Collection of Informative Materials for Judicial Officers

An Introduction to Mental Health Disorders

Materials submitted by George Parker, M.D., Director of Forensic Psychiatry and Associate Professor of Clinical Psychiatry at the Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis; and Jamie Wiles, M.D., Clinical Director of Mental Health Services, Correctional Medical Services (CMS).

Session Presentation (Introduction to Mental Health Disorders)
46 pages | 791 kb

Session Presentation (Behavioral Health Services at Indiana DOC)
15 pages | 51 kb

This program presented a primer on the most common and most serious mental health disorders, focusing on the typical symptoms of psychotic disorders, mood disorders, anxiety disorders, and major childhood disorders, with brief comments on the treatment approaches for these disorders.  It covered material discussed in previous sessions at Indiana Judicial Conference meetings. The second part of the program was a presentation on how the Indiana Department of Correction provides mental health and substance abuse treatment services to offenders in their custody.  The organization and extent of services was described, along with some of the challenges faced by mental health professionals when working in prison settings.

Litigants with Language Barriers

Materials submitted by Enrica Ardemagni, Professor of Spanish and Director of Certificate in Translation Studies, IUPUI-Indianapolis; Lilia Judson, Executive Director, Division of State Court Administration.

Session Presentation (Litigants with Language Barriers)
64 pages | 1 mb

The need for qualified interpreter services in Indiana’s courtrooms continues to rise. Court rule, case law, state statute, and federal law all govern access to the court system for litigants with language barriers, also known as limited English proficient (LEP) litigants. This nuts and bolts program focused on issues judicial officers face in providing language access in the court including: the types of language interpretation, interpreters and “certified” interpreters, payment for interpreter services, the impact of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 on language access and LEP’s, Department of Justice requirements and LEP plans, among others.

Psychiatric Evaluations for the Courts

Materials submitted by George Parker, M.D., Director of Forensic Psychiatry and Associate Professor of Clinical Psychiatry at the Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis.

Session Presentation (Criminal Forensic Psychiatric Evaluations: Practice & Outcomes)
76 pages | 1.3 mb

This session covered the most common situations when judicial officers will review psychiatric evaluations: civil commitment, competence to stand trial, and sanity at the time of the offense.  The procedures for the various types of civil commitment, including outpatient commitment, were reviewed.  The process for finding mental health professionals to do court-ordered competence evaluations was discussed, as well as the elements of a thorough competence report. In addition, the process of competence restoration was described.  The issue of unrestorability was reviewed in light of recent decisions by the Indiana Supreme Court and Court of Appeals. Finally, the assessment of sanity at the time of the offense was discussed. 

The Dark Side of Judging

Materials submitted by Becky Brooks, LCSW, Clinical Case Manager, Judges and Lawyers Assistance Program; Terry Harrell, Executive Director, Judges and Lawyers Assistance Program; and Hon. John Rader, Warren Circuit Court.

Session Presentation (Helping a Colleague: What do you do?)
58 pages | 2 mb

Session Handout (Resources for Managing Stress)
2 pages | 94 kb

Session Handout (Article: Judges and Depression)
6 pages | 97 kb

Session Handout (Professional Self-Care Worksheet)
2 pages | 70 kb

Judging takes an emotional toll that can affect more than the courtroom. This interactive discussion explored the problems, recommended solutions, and explained how to help a colleague.

Dynamics of Domestic Violence: Protecting Victims, Protecting Ourselves

Session Presentation
25 pages | 107 kb

Materials submitted by Professor Margaret Drew, Director, Domestic Violence and Civil Protection Order Clinic, University of Cincinnati College of Law. Presented at the 2010 Spring Judicial College Program, April 15, 2010.

Survivors of domestic violence often present in ways that seem outside the range of normative behavior, thus impeding their effective use of the legal process.  This workshop reviewed how we often misinterpret survivor behavior and explored how implementing techniques of empathetic language and mastering understanding of the dynamics of abuse will protect the court in the event that future harm comes to the litigant.  Professor Drew also addressed how the impact of hearing distressing information on a frequent basis affects judicial officers.   She explored the resulting stress that handling abuse cases visits upon the trier of fact and discussed ways in which to minimize the impact of that stress.  

Courtroom Best Practices in Self-Represented Litigation

Session Presentation
84 pages | 4.58 mb

Course curriculum focused attention on the application of the Code of Judicial Conduct, advisory opinions and case law implicated in civil SRL cases; different styles of engagement with litigants in the courtroom; the development of strategies of engagement which promote access to justice without being or seeming biased to participants; and the development of a systems approach for clerks and court staff who deal with SRLs.  Portions of the curriculum were drawn from a model curriculum developed by the National Judicial College, the National Center for State Courts, the American Judicature Society and the Self-Represented Litigation Network on courtroom best practices in self-represented litigation cases.  Faculty included John Greacen, Greacen Associates, New Mexico; Hon. Gregory Donat,Tippecanoe Superior Court; and Hon. Jane Spencer Craney, Morgan Superior Court.

Predicting Dangerousness in the Courtroom

Session Presentation
50 pages | 357 kb

Materials prepared by Dr. George Parker, Director of Forensic Psychiatry, Indiana University School of Law.  Dr. Parker discussed the growing trend of programs designed to divert people with mental illness from entering the criminal justice system.  He reviewed the multiple points in the criminal justice process where people with mental illness can be identified and diverted, when appropriate, from the criminal justice system into appropriate treatment resources.

Keeping People with Mental Illness Out of Jail

Session Presentation
55 pages | 404 kb

Materials prepared by Dr. George Parker, Director of Forensic Psychiatry, Indiana University School of Law.  Dr. Parker discussed the growing trend of programs designed to divert people with mental illness from entering the criminal justice system.  He reviewed the multiple points in the criminal justice process where people with mental illness can be identified and diverted, when appropriate, from the criminal justice system into appropriate treatment resources.

Use of Court Interpreters

Tower of Babel: Working with Interpreters in a Legal Setting
42 pages | 634 kb
Materials prepared by Aleé Alger-Robbins, Federal and State Court Certified Interpreter & Trainer, Salem, Oregon and María Pabón López, Associate Professor of Law, Indiana University School of Law, Indianapolis.  The session examined the potentially detrimental impact of foreign language misinterpretation through anecdotal resources as well as the legal aspects of courtroom interpretation.  Participants engaged in exercises that mimic “real time” interpretation.  Ethical and constitutional dilemmas facing courts were illustrated.

Session Presentation
15 pages | 55 kb

Materials prepared by María Pabón López, Associate Professor of Law, Indiana University School of Law, Indianapolis. The session on court interpreters examined the potentially detrimental impact of foreign language misinterpretation through anecdotal resources.  Participants engaged in exercises that mimic "real time" interpretation.  Ethical and constitutional dilemmas facing courts as the need for interpreters continues to rise were illustrated.  The presentation by Professor López focused on the legal aspects of courtroom interpretation.

Psychobabble 101: Deciphering the Language of Mental Health Practitioners

Session Presentation
65 pages | 243 kb

Materials prepared by Professor Michael Jenuwine, J.D. Ph.D., Notre Dame Legal Aid Clinic. Professor Jenuwine provided an overview of mental health credentials, terminology, DSM-IV diagnoses, and psychological testing as they occur in civil and criminal proceedings. The seminar provided participants with foundational knowledge to assist them in better understanding the methods and limitations of psychologists, psychiatrists, social workers, and other mental health practitioners. It also provided an understanding of what these professionals should and should not be providing in legal proceedings.

Immigration Law Basics & Rights of Non-Citizens

Session Presentation
18 pages | 37 kb

Presentation by María Pabón López, Associate Prof. of Law, IU School of Law-Indianapolis.
Materials developed by Professor López for the 2006 Annual Meeting of the Judicial Conference of Indiana.

The Deaf & Hard of Hearing Litigant in Court

Session Presentation
29 pages | 68 kb

Presentation by © James W. Van Manen, Director of Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services and Jerry Cooper, Program Coordinator, DHHS.

Diversity and the Nature of Racism

Diversity and the Nature of Racism
7 pages | 72 kb

Susan H. Williams, Walter W. Foskett Professor, Indiana University School of Law–Bloomington. This article was used by Professor Kevin Brown during his session at the 2003 Indiana Judicial Conference on "Unconscious Racism - Does it Effect the Judicial System of Indiana?"

Principles & Techniques for Dealing with Self-Represented Litigants in the Courtroom

Session Presentation
114 pages | 577 kb

These materials were presented at the Spring 2006 Judicial College. Materials developed by John Greacen, Court Administration Consultant and former Director, Administrative Office of the Courts of New Mexico.

This workshop addressed what we know about self-represented litigants, case law and judicial discipline decisions from Indiana and elsewhere. Faculty discussed recurring problems encountered in hearings and trials in small claims cases, family law cases and criminal cases.

Recognizing the Person with a Mental Illness in Court

Session Presentation
117 pages | 354 kb

These materials were presented at the Spring 2006 Judicial College. Materials prepared by Dr. George Parker, M.D., Director of Forensic Psychiatry, Indiana University School of Medicine-Indianapolis and Barbara Collins, Marion Superior Court.

This course offered participants a number of practical, helpful ideas for identifying those persons who may have a mental illness and included a discussion of practical options available to judicial officers for management of mental health-related issues.