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Trauma System/Injury Prevention Program Home > Indiana's Trauma System > Trauma System Updates Trauma System Updates

Trauma Care Committee Update

New State Health Commissioner Jerome Adams, M.D., M.P.H., was introduced at the November 14 Indiana State Trauma Care Committee (ISTCC) meeting, where he expressed his excitement being the new State Health Commissioner and stressed the importance of collaboration between disciplines as a way to make Indiana’s trauma system the best it can be while continuing to save lives.

Gretchen Huffman from EMS for Children (EMS-C) presented the survey results of the EMS-C Pediatric Readiness Survey in which 106 out of the 121 hospitals responded to the assessment.  The survey also revealed that 27 percent of patients that are seen in Indiana emergency departments are pediatric patients.  She also said that ongoing education was key in providing adequate care to pediatric patients as many of the hospitals surveyed currently are not paying for any continuing ER nurse education as these trainings can be very expensive.

Spencer Grover of the Indiana Hospital Association (IHA) reported on the Emergency Department Education Requirements Survey conducted three years ago by IHA, where 79 hospitals responded to the six-question survey.  IHA plans to repeat this survey in the Winter of 2015.

The statewide Trauma Registry received reports of 8,272 incidents reported during Quarter 2, 2014 (April-June) with 93 hospitals reporting data (nine trauma centers, 84 non-trauma centers).

Of the Public Health Preparedness Districts, all hospitals with emergency departments in districts 7 and 10 reported data to the Registry.

After much discussion about the Triage and Transport Rule, Mike Garvey of the Indiana Department of Homeland Security (IDHS) agreed to post a clarification about the rule on IDHS’ website.

Currently, there are 153 EMS providers submitting data to the Indiana EMS Registry, compared to 29 providers last year.  The EMS registry has grown from 215,000 runs to 695,803 as of November 2014.

Ten Indiana hospitals have become “in the process” trauma centers in the last year, with two facilities becoming ACS-verified Level IIIs.  However, the application to become an “in the process” facility needs more clarity and specificity.  After looking over the proposed revisions, the committee approved those revisions which provide clarity to hospitals applying to be considered “in the process”.  The revised  document will be presented to the EMS Commission meeting on December 12 for approval.

Finally, the Division of Trauma and Injury Prevention also gave an update on the Indiana Violent Death Reporting System (INVDRS), which is funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  INVDRS will gather vital records data, law enforcement records and coroner reports in order to better understand the circumstances of violent deaths, including homicides, suicides, undetermined intent deaths, legal intervention and unintentional firearm deaths.  Data collection for violent death information in six pilot counties including Allen, Lake, Madison, Marion, St. Joseph and Vanderburgh will begin January 1.

The 2015 ISTCC meetings will be in ISDH’s Rice Auditorium on the following days:

Friday, February 20, May 22, August 21 and November 20.

The IU InterFACE Center at Rehabilitation Hospital of Indiana

By Dawn Neumann, PhD, Assistant Professor, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (PM&R) and Research Associate, Rehabilitation Hospital of Indiana

The IU Interactive and Functional Assessment of Communication and Emotion Center (InterFACE Center) at the Rehabilitation Hospital of Indiana (RHI)) is a human observation laboratory designed to research emotions, social cognition, behaviors, and interpersonal interactions in clinical populations, and to empirically evaluate the effectiveness of therapeutic interventions.  The overall goal of the clinical research generated from the IU InterFACE Center is to guide evidence-based treatment approaches in rehabilitation facilities.

The IU InterFACE Center at RHI has a living room design and is equipped with state-of-the-art  technology that as a whole is not found anywhere else in the world.  This includes:

· High definition cameras

· Advanced eye-tracking capability

· Wireless equipment, such as, ECG, for monitoring  physiological responses

· Impedance cardiography

· Finger pulse, galvanic skin response, respiration and EMG

· Automated facial expression analysis software

· Immersive virtual reality  

There are two exciting projects underway in the IU InterFACE Center at RHI.  The first pertains to the evaluation of facial affect recognition deficits after traumatic brain injury (TBI), which is prevalent in approximately 39 percent of patients with moderate to severe TBI.                                                                                             

This research examines participants’ ability to identify facial expressions while recording their visual scanning patterns, physiological responses, and neural activity during facial affect recognition tasks. The study compares participants with TBI who have impairments recognizing facial expressions to participants with TBI and healthy controls who have normal facial affect recognition. 

This study, currently in the data analysis stage, is a collaborative project between the IU Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Department and the Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences at the Neuroscience Center.  Eye-tracking and physiological data were recorded at the IU InterFACE Center at RHI, and brain activity was measured at the Neuroscience Center using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Key investigators include Drs. Dawn Neumann, Michelle Keiski, Brenna McDonald, Yang Wang and Mr. John West.

The second project is a collaboration between two IU School of Medicine departments: Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and Emergency Medicine.  Dr. Jeffrey Kline, professor of Emergency Medicine and Vice Chair of Research, is an expert in the assessment and treatment of pulmonary embolism.  He proposes that the facial expressions of patients who come to the Emergency Department (ED) complaining of cardiopulmonary symptoms provide important information about the person’s health.   Concern and uncertainty about the risk for pulmonary embolism commonly leads to expensive, and often unnecessary computerized tomographic pulmonary angiography (CTPA) testing. 

Using the automated facial analyses software in the IU InterFACE Center at RHI, Dr. Kline and Dr. Neumann are collaborating on a study to empirically test the predictive value of patients’ facial expressions as an indicator of serious illness.  In the ED,  patients’ facial expressions in response to stimuli meant to evoke an emotional response are recorded and compared to their response to a neutral stimulus.  Patient videos are sent to the IU InterFACE Center for analyses.  The working hypothesis, which was supported in an earlier pilot study, is that patients with more serious diagnoses have less variability in their facial expressions in response to emotional stimuli.                                                                                      

These two projects illustrate the type of meaningful work and the unique multi-disciplinary  collaborations that are possible through the IU InterFACE Center at RHI.  It is exciting to imagine the advanced levels of research that can be accomplished through the resources available at the IU InterFACE Center at RHI.  The Center has great potential to accelerate clinical implementation of  evidenced-based research into rehabilitation practice. 

Holiday Home Safety

We’re well into the holiday season now, but it’s always important to note some home safety tips to prevent injury and fire.  Home fires during the holiday season often involve cooking, Christmas trees, candles and holiday decorations. The National Fire Protection Association has these home tips for holiday fire safety:

· Create a “kid-free zone” at least three feet around the stove and areas where hot food and drinks are prepared and carried.  Stay in the kitchen when cooking on the stovetop, and do not hold children while preparing food because hot liquids may splatter.

· Fire departments respond to an average of 230 structure fires caused by Christmas trees each year. One in three of these fires are caused by electrical problems, and one in five resulted from a heat source that is too close to the tree. Never use lit candles to decorate the tree.

· After Christmas, get rid of the tree because dried-out trees are a fire hazard. Old trees should not be left in the home or garage, or placed outside the home. Check with your local community to find a recycling program.

· When using candles to decorate the home, remember to keep them at least 12 inches away from anything that can burn.  Remember to blow them out when you leave the room or go to bed.

For information about how to safely prepare your holiday meal, visit: http://www.cdc.gov/features/turkeytime/. For information about home holiday fire prevention, visit: http://www.nfpa.org/safety-information/for-consumers/holidays

Pre-Hospital & Holiday Season Drunk Driving Prevention

We’re well into the holiday season now, but it’s always important to note some home safety tips to prevent injury and fire.  Home fires during the holiday season often involve cooking, Christmas trees, candles and holiday decorations. The National Fire Protection Association has these home tips for holiday fire safety:

· Create a “kid-free zone” at least three feet around the stove and areas where hot food and drinks are prepared and carried.  Stay in the kitchen when cooking on the stovetop, and do not hold children while preparing food because hot liquids may splatter.

· Fire departments respond to an average of 230 structure fires caused by Christmas trees each year. One in three of these fires are caused by electrical problems, and one in five resulted from a heat source that is too close to the tree. Never use lit candles to decorate the tree.

· After Christmas, get rid of the tree because dried-out trees are a fire hazard. Old trees should not be left in the home or garage, or placed outside the home. Check with your local community to find a recycling program.

· When using candles to decorate the home, remember to keep them at least 12 inches away from anything that can burn.  Remember to blow them out when you leave the room or go to bed.

For information about how to safely prepare your holiday meal, visit: http://www.cdc.gov/features/turkeytime/. For information about home holiday fire prevention, visit: http://www.nfpa.org/safety-information/for-consumers/holidays

Emergency Nursing Pediatric Course (ENPC)

Pre-Hospital & Holiday Season Drunk Driving Prevention

We’re well into the holiday season now, but it’s always important to note some home safety tips to prevent injury and fire.  Home fires during the holiday season often involve cooking, Christmas trees, candles and holiday decorations. The National Fire Protection Association has these home tips for holiday fire safety:

· Create a “kid-free zone” at least three feet around the stove and areas where hot food and drinks are prepared and carried.  Stay in the kitchen when cooking on the stovetop, and do not hold children while preparing food because hot liquids may splatter.

· Fire departments respond to an average of 230 structure fires caused by Christmas trees each year. One in three of these fires are caused by electrical problems, and one in five resulted from a heat source that is too close to the tree. Never use lit candles to decorate the tree.

· After Christmas, get rid of the tree because dried-out trees are a fire hazard. Old trees should not be left in the home or garage, or placed outside the home. Check with your local community to find a recycling program.

· When using candles to decorate the home, remember to keep them at least 12 inches away from anything that can burn.  Remember to blow them out when you leave the room or go to bed.

For information about how to safely prepare your holiday meal, visit: http://www.cdc.gov/features/turkeytime/. For information about home holiday fire prevention, visit: http://www.nfpa.org/safety-information/for-consumers/holidays

Improving Patient Care Through Trauma System Collaboration

By Amanda Elikofer, MSN, RN, NE-BC, Department Manager for Trauma Services, IV Therapy and WOCN Services at Deaconess Hospital, Evansville and Lisa Gray, BSN, RN, CPN, Director, Trauma Services at St. Mary's Adult and Pediatric Trauma Centers, Evansville

Trauma systems are responsible for saving lives by ensuring that severely injured patients receive the care they need in a timely fashion.  Perhaps more simply stated:  right patient, right place, right time.  Very few individual facilities can provide all resources to all patients in all locations.  This reality enforces the development of an inclusive trauma system for care instead of simply developing trauma centers.   As trauma systems mature, most hospitals will seek trauma center designation or withdraw from treatment of acute traumatic injury.  In most trauma systems, a combination of levels (I, II, & III) co-exist with other acute care facilities.  Regional trauma systems are beneficial as they bring the coordinated power of systems to the local level where it can best be used, while at the same time functioning within the overall statewide trauma system.

Regional trauma system plans are the cornerstone in the development of a state trauma system.   The overarching goal of the District 10 Regional Trauma System Plan is to engage every hospital and pre-hospital service within our geographical region to ensure the rapid flow of injured patients to the proper facility for best patient care for optimal outcomes.  

Serving a population of approximately 400,000 people in 12 counties, the District 10 Trauma Regional Advisory Council (D10TRAC) has evolved as a result of the local interests and grassroots efforts of approximately 90 EMS units, 500 EMS providers and the 10 hospitals that represent southern Indiana. 

As charged by the ACS-COT, verified trauma centers must have meaningful participation in state and regional trauma system planning, development, and operations.  It is the responsibility of St. Mary’s Medical Center and Deaconess Hospital, the Level II Trauma Centers in District 10, to build a regional trauma system plan.

With the goal of achieving the recommendations from the American College of Surgeons-Committee on Trauma State Consultative visit in 2011, an invitation was extended to all trauma stakeholders to participate in the work required to develop and implement a regional trauma system plan.   Modeling states with mature regional and state trauma system plans (i.e. Texas, Ohio, Pennsylvania), the first success of D10TRAC was the development of formal by-laws and establishment of an executive committee.  The co-chairs of the committee are trauma medical directors, Dr. Stephen Lanzarotti and Dr. W. Matthew Vassy.  D10TRAC meetings are held on a quarterly basis and the location of the meeting rotates among hospitals in the district.  A case study with opportunity for improvement and/or education is presented by the hosting facility. 

An accomplishment for District 10 is inclusive participation in the state trauma registry.   To align with the goals and work of the ISDH Department of Trauma and Injury Prevention, the staff at the local trauma centers worked closely with staff from each of the non-trauma centers to deliver additional hands-on training and education.   As a result, District 10 has 100% hospital participation in the state trauma registry.  We now have the ability to look at data specific to District 10 to guide  performance improvement initiatives at the local and regional level.  Those performance improvement initiatives directly align with those of the IN State Trauma PI Committee.  In addition, an education sub-committee has been established to provide technical assistance and education to regional hospitals and providers for the purposes of improving system performance.  

Some additional goals and ideal functions of D10TRAC include ensuring collaboration among all trauma providers and related agencies, the promotion of regional and the state trauma system initiatives, and system-wide performance improvement.

Because of the commitment, dedication and contribution of our trauma colleagues, D10TRAC is making great strides in trauma care in Indiana.  We are very proud of the work we have accomplished thus far and hope this information will be useful for other districts in the state as we strive to improve the trauma care of Hoosiers and reduce the number of preventable deaths in Indiana.  

For more information:  https://sites.google.com/site/dist10trauma/

Rehabilitation Hospital of Indiana Provides Nationally Recognized Statewide Service

By Lance E. Trexler, PhD, HSPP, FACRM, Clinical Neuropsychologist and Executive Director, Departments of Rehabilitation Neuropsychology and Resource Facilitation, Rehabilitation Hospital of Indiana

Clinical researchers at Rehabilitation Hospital of Indiana (RHI) are implementing a statewide program to assist people with acquired brain injury (traumatic brain injury, stroke, and other brain injuries/illnesses) with returning to school or work.

Resource Facilitation (RF) is a service developed several decades ago to provide system navigation to people with brain injury and their families.  The path to return to work after a brain injury has many gaps in the continuum of care and often involves different providers, state agencies and funding mechanisms.  Only about 30-40% of people with acquired brain injuries (ABI) typically return to school or work.  RF is a process that identifies needs and resources, isolates barriers, facilitates access to resources, and ensures coordination of services on an individualized basis.  RF is provided by a multidisciplinary team of brain injury rehabilitation professionals.

Initial research on resource facilitation was conducted by Dr. Jim Malec, now the RHI Director of Research, when at Mayo Clinic.  Dr. Malec and colleagues studied what they referred to as vocational case coordination and found that subjects had significantly better vocational outcomes. 

Through funding from the Health Resources Services Administration (HRSA) to the Indiana Vocational Rehabilitation Services (VRS) in 2006, RHI’s Dr. Lance Trexler and coworkers conducted the first randomized controlled trial of RF and found that 64% of those subjects who got RF returned to work compared to 36% of the controls.  Further, RF subjects also demonstrated significant improvement in participation in activities in the home and community. 

An economic impact study was performed by the Ball State University Center for Business and Economic Research.  This demonstrated that if people were provided RF, Indiana would avoid $31 million annually in lost wages, not including the $15 million loss associated with business and tax revenues nor the positive impact of return to work for disability carriers, Medicaid and Medicare.  Dr. Trexler then received HRSA funding again in 2009.

Based on the 2006 HRSA grant success, the Indiana Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation (IBVR) again funded RHI to develop a state-wide RF services infrastructure.  Simultaneously, RHI researchers were funded by the Indiana Spinal Cord and Brain Injury Research Board to conduct a second RF trial.  Further, RHI conducted a clinical cohort RF study , both of which corroborated findings that between 64 to 69% of RF recipients return to work or school.  Based on the research findings, the IBVR decided to provide RF services for people in Indiana with ABI to return to work or school.

From 2006 to 2014, RF evolved from research to practice to policy in Indiana.  Through RHI, and thanks to leadership from the Indiana VRS, including Kylee Hope, Theresa Koleszar, and Peri Rogowski, Indiana is the first state to provide RF.  RF in Indiana is the result of public/private collaboration through federal and state funds in addition to the RHI Foundation.  Hoosiers with ABI now have a better chance of returning to school or work.  Lastly, RHI has recently been funded by another HRSA grant through the Indiana Department of Corrections to determine if RF can reduce recidivism and improve employment outcomes for ex-offenders in Indiana.

Rapid Improvement Event (RIE) held September 8-12 at IU Health Bloomington

By Lindsey Williams, RN, BSN Trauma Program Manager, Indiana University (IU) Health Bloomington

The Indiana University Bloomington Hospital held a Rapid Improvement Event (RIE) regarding length of stay (LOS) for trauma transfer patients.  A benchmark of <120 minutes has been identified as the goal for all trauma transfer patients by the Indiana State Trauma Care Committee (ISTCC).  

Critical patients are identified as those who have the following:

· A Glasgow Coma Scale of  ≤ 12 at any time during their ED stay

· An Injury Severity Scale > 15

· A Shock Index (Heart Rate ÷ Systolic Blood Pressure) > 0.9

There are many factors that contribute to the ED LOS including disposition decision, radiology read times, physician response, transfer arrangements, transportation availability and weather are all contributing factors.  During our RIE, we were able to decrease ED LOS during our experimental phase of the event by a significant amount of time.  We have altered our standard work at IU Health Bloomington for the RN, physician and ancillary staff as well as involving the IU Health Transfer Center in organizing the transfer of our patients.  We conducted the RIE with participation from IU Health Bloomington,, representatives from IU Health LifeLine, IU Health Transfer Center, IU Health Bedford, IU Health Bloomington Emergency Medical Transport Services, IU Health Bloomington Chief Medical Officer and incorporated many Emergency Department employees’ input into this process.  We are currently in the sustainment phase and have identified other areas for improvement which we were unable to predict with “rapid experiments”. 

Indiana Violent Death Reporting System

The Indiana State Department of Health submitted a successful application for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention funding opportunity to establish the Indiana Violent Death Reporting System (INVDRS). As part of the grant requirements, the ISDH hosted the first Indiana Violent Death Reporting System Advisory Board meeting September 30. The meeting was attended by more than 50 people representing a range of interested agencies and organizations.

The meeting included an overview of the CDC’s National Violent Death Reporting System,  which collects aggregate data on violent deaths from state-based partnerships. In order to participate in the national registry, the ISDH will maintain the Indiana Violent Death Reporting System. The purpose of the project is to collect, maintain, and disseminate complete and comprehensive surveillance data on violent deaths that occurred in Indiana beginning January 1, 2015. Information on violent deaths will be collected through coroner reports, death certificates, law enforcement  for the purposes of better informing local, state, and national violence prevention efforts. The presentation included discussing other state’s success stories and the potential for county funding for record submission.

The next Advisory Board meeting is December 9 from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. This meeting will include information from the INVDRS staff’s reverse site visit at the CDC, such as data confidentiality, data collection, and steps moving forward.

To learn more about the INVDRS and stay up to date about the project, visit: http://www.state.in.us/isdh/26539.htm

Trauma Nursing Core Course, November 6-7

The Trauma Nursing Core Course (TNCC) provides cognitive, core-level trauma knowledge and psychomotor skills experience through an interactive format. The course is intended for registered nurses with at least six months of clinical nursing experience in an emergency, critical care, or peri-operative setting prior to taking this course.  

Course highlights include:

· Teamwork and Trauma Care

· Initial Assessment

· Airway, Ventilation, Shock

· Brain, Cranial, Facial & Spinal Trauma

· Thoracic, Abdominal, Pelvic & Extremity Trauma

· Trauma nursing skills station

To learn more visit: http://www.in.gov/isdh/25966.htm and click Trauma Nursing Core Course for the registration form and send to:

Wendy Hums, MSN, RN, CEN

Elkhart General Hospital, Trauma Services

600 East Blvd., Elkhart, IN 46514

2nd Annual Ortho Trauma Symposium, November 7

The Indiana University Health Methodist Orthopedic Trauma Service will hold its 2nd Annual Ortho Trauma Symposium November 7 at the Indiana Convention Center in Indianapolis.

Greg Osgood, MD will be the Symposium’s keynote speaker.  He is an assistant professor of orthopaedic surgery at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. His areas of expertise include orthopaedic trauma, with a special focus on fracture non-unions, pelvis and acetabular injuries, and fractures and surgical infections.

This activity has been approved for 7 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits by IU Health Ball Memorial Hospital. The meeting is intended for caregivers from first responders through rehab therapists.  The meeting features nationally recognized faculty from IU Health System as well as other renowned trauma centers throughout the country.  The meeting includes breakfast, lunch, and a cocktail reception. There will also be an Exhibition Hall with the latest technology from vendors supporting the event. 

Please use the following link to register for the event - www.iuhealth.org/ots If you have any questions please contact: Beth Thompson (ethompson1@iuhealth.org).

2nd Annual Ortho Trauma Symposium, November 7

The Parkview Adult and Pediatric Trauma Centers are hosting the 4th Annual Pediatric Trauma Symposium, November 7 entitled, “Vital Necessities” at the Manchester University College of Pharmacy in Fort Wayne. 

 

This symposium is free with 2.75 nursing CEU’s offered for those who take care of pediatric trauma patients. The presentation topics on Friday will include Vital Signs in Children, Lethal Triad of Trauma and Pediatric Shock, Myths and Warning Signs of Children Abuse, Case Studies in Injury Prevention Failure and the Use of CT Imaging in the Pediatric Population.

 

Use the following link to register for the symposium - https://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/eventReg?oeidk=a07e9tdcczz84688dca&oseq=&c=&ch=For more information, contact Kellie Jacobs, Pediatric Trauma Coordinator, Trauma Services, at (kellie.jacobs@parkview.com).

2nd Annual Ortho Trauma Symposium, November 7

Deaconess Hospital and Deaconess Regional Trauma Center will host the 17th Annual Deaconess Trauma Conference, November 14 from 7:45 a.m. to 4:15 p.m. at the University of Southern Indiana in Carter Hall, which is located at 8600 University Blvd. in Evansville.

Speakers include Dr. Matt Vassy, Dr. Gina Huhnke, Dr. Todd Burry and Dr. Timothy Pohlman.  Other presenters include Kristina Brown, BSN, RN; Donna Cobb, RN, MSN, CCRN, CNRN; Sam Preston, BSW, MS; and Tony Toopes.

This conference is ideal for emergency department and critical care nurses, pre-hospital providers, EMS medical directors and emergency medicine physicians.  During the conference, participants will learn the following:

· Management of multiple traumatic injuries

· How to improve the care provided for traumatically injured patients

· Injuries resulting from frequently seen mechanisms of injury in a Level II Trauma Center

For more information and to register online, please visit www.deaconess.com/profcalendar and use keyword: “trauma conference.” If you have any questions, please call 812-450-2961.

Drowsy Driving Prevention Week November 2-9

The National Sleep Foundation declared November 2-9 to be Drowsy Driving Prevention Week. This annual campaign aims to educate the public about the under-reported risks of driving while drowsy and provide information on countermeasures to improve safety while driving.  The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration estimates that drowsy driving contributes to more than 100,000 crashes a year, resulting in 40,000 injuries and 1,500 deaths. Young drivers, shift workers and people working long hours, commercial drivers, business travelers, and people with untreated sleep disorders are at the most risk. Signs of sleepiness include trouble focusing, yawning or rubbing eyes repeated, daydreaming, drifting from driving lane, tailgating, or missing signs, feel restless and slower reaction time.

Risk factors for drowsy-driving crashes include the following chronic predisposing factors and acute situational factors:

· Sleep loss

· Driving patterns

· Use of sedation medications

· Untreated or unrecognized sleep disorders

· Consumption of alcohol

These factors also have a cumulative effect and a combination of one or more substantially increases crash risk.

For more information, visit: http://drowsydriving.org/resources/drowsy-driving-prevention-week-toolkit/

International Survivors of Suicide Loss Day is November 22

November 22 is the International Survivors of Suicide Loss Day. This event began in 1999.  Senator Harry Reid, a survivor of his father’s 1971 suicide, introduced a resolution into the US Senate. With its passage, the U.S. Congress designated the Saturday before Thanksgiving “National Survivors of Suicide Day,” a day on which friends and family of those who have died by suicide can join together for healing and support. 

This year’s event includes screening of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention's new documentary, The Journey. This documentary shares the stories of a diverse group of suicide loss survivors. The film can be viewed during an online screening for those who cannot attend the event in person.

To find an event closest to you, visit: http://www.survivorday.org/find-an-event/

For more information, visit: http://www.survivorday.org/

Improving Indiana State Department of Health Wins Federal Grant Award

The Indiana State Department of Health (ISDH) has received $1.4 million from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to gather critical data on violent deaths using the National Violent Death Reporting System (NVDRS). The grant to ISDH runs for five years. Indiana is one of 32 states to receive funds for this program.

NVDRS helps state and local officials understand when and how violent deaths occur by linking data from law enforcement, coroners and medical examiners, vital statistics and crime laboratories. Using these data, public health practitioners and violence prevention professionals can develop tailored prevention and intervention efforts to reduce violent deaths.

“To stop violent deaths, we must first understand all the facts,” said State Health Commissioner William VanNess, M.D. “NVDRS will provide a more complete picture of homicides, suicides and other unintentional deaths from firearms in Indiana. Knowing the circumstances of violent deaths will help identify the right prevention efforts and put them in place.”

NVDRS provides details on demographics (age, income, education), method of injury, the relationship between the victim and the suspect and information about circumstances such as depression, financial stressors, or relationship problems. It is the only data system for homicide that collects information from sources outside of law enforcement and that has the capacity to link hospital and other health records.

“More than 55,000 Americans died because of homicide or suicide in 2011 — that’s an average of more than six people dying a violent death every hour.” said Daniel M. Sosin, M.D., M.P.H., F.A.C.P., acting director of CDC’s National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. “This is disheartening and we know many of these deaths can be prevented. Participating states will be better able to use state-level data to develop, implement, and evaluate prevention and intervention efforts to stop violent deaths.”The Indiana Violent Death Reporting System (INVDRS) will gather vital records data, law enforcement records, and coroner reports into one central web-based registry in order to better understand the circumstances of violent deaths, including homicides, suicides, undetermined intent deaths and unintentional firearm deaths. Indiana observed 1,361 violent deaths in 2010, of which nearly 64 percent were suicides and 23 percent were homicides.

Indiana’s use of NVDRS is part of CDC’s expansion of the system from 18 to 32 participating states. The 32 states participating in NVDRS include Alaska, Arizona*, Colorado, Connecticut*, Georgia, Hawaii*, Illinois*, Indiana*, Iowa*, Kansas*, Kentucky, Maine*, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota*, North Carolina, New Hampshire*, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York*, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon,  Pennsylvania*, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Utah, Vermont*, Virginia, Washington*, and Wisconsin.  (*indicates new states)

 

For more information about NVDRS, visit: www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/nvdrs.

Social Media: #SafetyIN

The ISDH Division of Trauma and Injury Prevention is now utilizing social media. Find safety tips and more information on the ISDH’s Facebook Page and Twitter (@StateHealthIN). Look for posts that use the #SafetyIN hashtag for all Facebook and Twitter posts.

Traumatic Spinal Cord Injuries Lead to Extensive Inpatient Rehabiliation

Written by: Dr. Katherine Stenson, Medical Director, Rehabilitation Hospital of Indiana SCI Program

Annette Seabrook, MPT, FACHE, Chair, Indiana Rehab Task Force of Indiana Hospital Association and Program Director, Inpatient Rehabilitation Center at Franciscan St. Francis Health

A traumatic SCI is a life-changing event and many individuals will require inpatient rehabilitation as well as extensive outpatient/lifelong programs to maximize their independence.  The American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) scoring is utilized to determine injury level and completeness and to monitor neurologic recovery. Rehabilitation addresses the areas that are impacted including, but not limited to, voluntary movement; sensation; autonomic function; respiratory function; mobility; self-care and bowel/bladder and sexual function.  It is recommended that a SCI rehab program include home assessments, wheelchair seating and positioning, equipment prescription, psychology services (coping and adjustment), peer visitation, spasticity management and education/training in preventing secondary complications.

The database for the National Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems (NSCIMS) reports that (since 2010) 36.5 percent of spinal cord injuries (SCI) are the result of a motor vehicle crash. Other causes include falls (28.5 percent), violence (14.3 percent) and sports (9.2 percent).  The average age is now 42.6 years old.  NSCIMS also reports that “since 2010, the most frequent neurological category is incomplete tetraplegia (40.6 percent) followed by incomplete paraplegia (18.7 percent), complete paraplegia (18 percent) and complete tetraplegia (11.6 percent).  Less than 1 percent experience complete  recovery neurologically by discharge from the hospital.” Average acute care stays have declined to 11 days and days in rehab have declined to an average of 22-24 days. Depending on the level of injury, the estimated lifetime costs (in 2013 dollars) for someone injured at 25 years old is between $1.5 and $4.6 million. The greatest impact on reduced life expectancy is now pneumonia and septicemia.

Rehabilitation Hospital of Indiana (RHI) is the only facility in Indiana that is accredited by Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) in the specialty area of SCI. Katherine Stenson, M.D., medical director of RHI’s SCI program and fellowship trained and subspecialty boarded in SCI, feels that it is extremely important for individuals with SCI to get a high level of medical oversight, therapy, and specialized education as soon as possible after SCI in acute inpatient rehabilitation (not subacute).  “The knowledge and training gained in the acute rehab phase sets the groundwork for one’s health and wellbeing immediately as well as for successfully adjusting to and living with a SCI over the long term.  Without this specific training early on, there is a higher risk for complications from SCI that can be quite devastating.  And each one of these complications is preventable with the proper care and teaching,” said Dr. Stenson.  RHI has also partnered with neurosurgery in pharmaceutical research on a novel acute intervention in this population and Dr. Stenson has recently received funding to study obesity and diabetes prevention in individuals with paraplegia. 

Family and caregivers will need to be extensively involved in the rehab process, so location is a factor; however, the expertise of the professionals at the facility should be the most important deciding factor in where rehabilitation is carried out.  Unless there is a complicated weight-bearing status, wound, or vent weaning that would impact the individual’s ability to participate in rehabilitation, the patient should receive rehabilitation in an acute rehabilitation setting. Additional barriers to inpatient rehabilitation may include financial constraints (lack of coverage for rehabilitation but also equipment and post-discharge needs) or lack of adequate support/discharge plan as most individuals require some level of physical assistance initially post-discharge from rehabilitation.

Indiana's Traumatic Brain Injury Model System

Written by Susan Hartlerode, MS, CCC-SLP,  CBIS;im Graham; and Jim Malec, PhD Rehabilitation Hospital of Indiana and IUSM Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation.

For nearly two years, the partnership of Indiana University School of Medicine (IUSM) and the Rehabilitation Hospital of Indiana (RHI) has been one of sixteen rehabilitation centers designated as a Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) Model System site. This designation has allowed RHI/IUSM physicians, researchers and clinical staff to collaborate with other national leaders in brain injury care and research. 

For TBI, RHI offers an interdisciplinary approach of physicians, other clinicians, and researchers specializing and credentialed in working with individuals who have a TBI including those with disorders of consciousness.  This team consists of neuropsychologists, physiatrists, physical therapists, occupational therapists, speech and language pathologists and nurses.

The TBI Model Systems began in 1987 through grants from the United States Department of Education and the National Institute on Disability Rehabilitation and Research (NIDRR) and is a network of the leading centers in medical rehabilitation research and patient care that focus on tracking and improving recovery of individuals with TBI. Sites selected to be a part of the TBI Model Systems provide a continuum of care from the initial onset of injury through return to community and work.  Grants are awarded to facilities in five year cycles. 

Each Model System like RHI/IUSM collects data to be entered into a longitudinal national database managed by the Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems National Data and Statistical Center at Craig Hospital in Englewood, Colorado.  Data on long term outcomes for individuals with TBI has been collected through the TBI Model Systems for over 25 years. Participation in this national database allows RHI to follow its patients with TBI over the long term. In addition to contributing to this longitudinal database, each TBI Model System center pilots its own studies.  Currently, the Indiana TBI Model System at RHI is studying the effect of irritability and aggression following TBI through a research initiative called the Brain Research in Irritability and Aggression Network (BRAIN). BRAIN researchers are developing methods to better understand and reduce the negative impact of irritability and aggression on those with TBI and their families. It is estimated that 29-71 percent of those with TBI have irritability and aggression that negatively impacts social interactions and employment. 

Clinical staff at RHI benefit from the TBI Model System designation in numerous ways.  Each year, RHI staff attends an annual leadership conference in which they are able to collaborate with other national leaders in TBI rehabilitation.  RHI clinicians have the opportunity to discuss best practice diagnostic and treatment plans, analyze cutting edge therapeutic equipment and materials, and gain insight into the practices of the leading brain injury specialists in the country. For example, RHI staff learned the benefit of a car transfer simulator and has implemented a TRAN-SIT® Car Transfer Simulator in which patients can practice safe car transfers from the convenience of the therapy gym without regard to weather conditions. Also, once a month, TBI clinicians from RHI participate in teleconference meetings in which they are able to discuss pertinent topics related to rehabilitative care of patients with TBI.

The entire TBI staff at RHI are proud to be recognized as part of the TBI Model Systems and assume the responsibility of this recognition by continuing to offer the highest level of rehabilitation services in Indiana. In the words of Dr. Daniel B. Woloszyn, CEO and Clinical Neuropsychologist at RHI: “As the sole traumatic brain injury model system site in the state of Indiana, this award further validates best practice in rehabilitation care.  It is comforting  for RHI patients, acute care hospital physicians, and the Indianapolis community to know that patients with brain injuries, those sustaining strokes, spinal cord injuries, multiple trauma and other injuries or illnesses have available to them outstanding rehabilitation professionals at the Rehabilitation Hospital of Indiana and Indiana University School of Medicine.”

2nd Annual Ortho Trauma Symposium, November 7

The Indiana University Health Methodist Orthopedic Trauma Service will hold its 2nd Annual Ortho Trauma Symposium November 7 at the Indiana Convention Center in Indianapolis.

Greg Osgood, M.D. will be the Symposium’s keynote speaker.  He is an assistant professor of orthopaedic surgery at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. His areas of expertise include orthopaedic trauma, with a special focus on fracture non-unions, pelvis and acetabular injuries, and fractures and surgical infections.

This activity has been approved for 7.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits by Ball State University School of Medicine. The meeting is intended for caregivers from first responders through rehab therapists.  The meeting features nationally recognized faculty from IU Health System as well as other renowned trauma centers throughout the country.  The meeting includes breakfast, lunch, and a cocktail reception. There will also be an Exhibition Hall with the latest technology from vendors supporting the event. 

Please use the following link to register for the event - www.iuhealth.org/ots There is a 10 percent early bird registration discount before October 14. If you have any questions please contact: Beth Thompson (ethompson1@iuhealth.org).

American College of Surgeons Changes Site Visit Process

The American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma consultation/verification program verifies the presence of the resources listed in the current edition of the document Resources for Optimal Care of  the Injured Patient.  This is a voluntary process, which includes a report outlining the site visit findings, and if applicants are successful, a certificate of verification is issued.

Site visit applications must return completed site visit application 12 months in advance to preferred timeframe. The ACS is no longer accepting site visit applications to be scheduled for 2014 and January–May 2015. Visits scheduled prior to July 1, 2015 will be reviewed by the Resources 2006 manual (Green Book). Visits scheduled after July 1, 2015 will be reviewed by the Resources 2014 manual (Orange Book) and are required to contact the VRC office for further directions and information. There will be a rate increase for visits that occur after this date. Questions or concerns about the application process may be directed to the trauma verification office at  312-202-5134 or by email at Anita.johnson@facs.org. For more information, visit: https://www.facs.org/quality-programs/trauma/vrc/site-packet

2014 Prescription Drug Abuse Symposium, October 16 & 17

The 2014 Prescription Drug Abuse Symposium: Reversing the Tide of Opioid Abuse will be held October 16-17 at the Westin Hotel, in downtown Indianapolis.  The symposium will have Continuing Education credits, including: CME, CLE, CEUs for Mental Health & Addiction Treatment Professionals, State Board of Pharmacy credits, and LETBs for Law Enforcement.  To register for the event, visit: http://www.eventbrite.com/e/5th-annual-prescription-drug-abuse-symposium-tickets-12006548911

Injury Prevention Advisory Council State Plan and Conference

The Injury Prevention Advisory Council (IPAC) works to reduce the number and severity of preventable injuries in Indiana through leadership and advocacy.  IPAC meets quarterly to network and learn more about injury prevention.  Currently, IPAC is drafting a state injury prevention plan and will host an injury prevention conference in 2015. Jessica Skiba, ISDH injury prevention epidemiologist, currently sends all interested partners bi-weekly email updates with important injury prevention articles, news, and resources. 

The IPAC Terms of Reference were approved at the September 10 meeting, and Lisa Davis, American Foundation for Suicide Prevention Indiana Chapter Chair, gave a presentation for National Suicide Prevention week and World Suicide Prevention day.

The last meeting of the year will be Thursday, November 20 from 1 p.m.-3 p.m. EST. The 2015 meetings will be from 1 p.m.–3 p.m. in Rice Auditorium on the following days:

  • Thursday, March 12, 2015
  • Thursday, June 18, 2015
  • Thursday, September 17, 2015
  • Thursday, December 10, 2015

For those who are working in injury prevention and have an interest in creating a safe and injury-free Indiana are welcome to join IPAC. 

If you are interested in becoming a member of IPAC or would like more information, contact Jessica Skiba at jskiba@isdh.in.gov  or at 317-233-7716.

Fire Prevention Week, October 5-11

October 5-11 is the 92nd annual Fire Prevention Week, hosted by the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA). The 2014 campaign theme is  “Smoke Alarms Save Lives: Test Yours Every Month.” According to the latest NFPA research, working smoke alarms cut in half the chance of dying in a fire.  The NFPA offers these fast facts for smoke alarms:

· Almost three of five (60 percent) reported home fire deaths in 2007 to 2011 occurred in homes with no smoke alarms or no working smoke alarms.

· In fires considered large enough to activate the smoke alarm, hardwired alarms operated 93 percent of the time, while battery powered alarms operated only 79 percent of the time.

· When smoke alarms fail to operate, it is usually because batteries are missing, disconnected, or dead.

· An ionization smoke alarm is generally more responsive to flaming fires and a photoelectric smoke alarm is generally more responsive to smoldering fires. For the best protection, or where extra time is needed, to awaken or assist others, both types of alarms, or combination ionization and               photoelectric alarms are recommended.

For more information, visit: http://www.nfpa.org/safety-information/fire-prevention-week

 

October is National Bullying Prevention Month

October is National Bullying Prevention Month. The Parent Advocacy Coalition for Education Rights (PACER) National Center for Bullying Prevention’s 2014 campaign theme is “The End of Bullying Begins with Me.”  The campaign includes activities, education, and awareness for bullying prevention.  While bullying was once thought to be a “childhood right of passage,” the effects of bullying can be devastating, including school avoidance, loss of self-esteem, increased anxiety and depression.

PACER created the campaign in 2006 to encourage everyone to take an active role in preventing bullying.  Unity Day is Wednesday, October 22, when everyone can come together—in schools, communities, and online—and send one large orange message of support, hope, and unity.

For more information about National Bullying Prevention Month, visit: http://www.pacer.org/bullying/nbpm/

 

Trauma Registry Rule - update

The Trauma Registry rule, signed into law by Governor Pence last October, requires all EMS transport providers, hospitals with emergency departments and the State’s seven rehabilitation hospitals to report trauma cases to the ISDH trauma registry. The rule has been effective since November 24.

The following EMS services have submitted data to the Indiana Trauma Registry for 2014:

  • A&A Township VFD 
  • Aboite Township VFD
  • Adams County EMS
  • Adams Markleville Fire Protection Terr.
  • Advance Volunteer Fire Department
  • Air Methods Corporation / UCAN
  • Air Methods—Kentucky
  • Albany EMS
  • Alcoa EMS Warrick
  • Alexandria FD
  • American Medical Response (AMR)
  • Argos Community Ambulance Services
  • Bargersville Community Fire Department
  • Batesville Volunteer Fire & Rescue Department
  • Beech Grove FD
  • Boone County EMS
  • Bright Volunteer Fire Department
  • Brownsburg Fire Territory
  • Burns Harbor FD
  • Care Ambulance Service (Indianapolis)
  • Carlisle Lions Community Ambulance
  • Carmel Fire Department
  • Carroll County EMS
  • City of Gary FD
  • City of Lawrence FD
  • City of Nappanee EMS
  • City of Rushville FD
  • Clay Township Fire Territory
  • Cleveland Township Fire Territory
  • Clinton County EMS (Frankfort)
  • Coatesville Volunteer Fire Department
  • Columbus Regional Hospital Ambulance Service
  • Crawford County Ambulance Service
  • Crown Point Fire Rescue Department
  • Culberson Ambulance Service
  • Danville Fire Dept./Center Twp. Trustee
  • Decatur Township FD
  • DeKalb EMS
  • Delaware County/Muncie EMS
  • Dublin VFD Inc.
  • Eli Lilly & Company
  • Fayette County EMS
  • Fire Dept. of Liberty Twp.
  • Fishers FD
  • Fountain County Ambulance
  • Franklin County EMS
  • Fulton County EMS
  • Gas City Rescue Squad-Grant County 
  • Gaston VFD
  • Gibson County EMS
  • Goshen FD
  • Grace on Wings Inc.
  • Grant County EMS
  • Greene County Ambulance Service
  • Greenfield FD
  • Harrison County Hospital EMS
  • Harrison Township Volunteer Fire Department (Kokomo)
  • Hoagland EMS & VFD
  • Hobart FD
  • Honey Creek FD
  • Huntertown VFD
  • Indianapolis EMS
  • Indiana Collegiate EMS
  • Indiana University Health-Bedford
  • Indiana University Health-Bloomington
  • Indiana University Health-Indianapolis
  • Indiana University Health-Paoli
  • Jay County EMS
  • Jefferson Center/Whitley County VFD
  • JeffersonTownship Ambulance 
  • Keener Township EMS
  • King’s Daughters’ Health
  • Knox County EMS
  • Ladoga Rescue, Inc.
  • Lake Hills VFD
  • Lake of the Four Seasons Fire Force
  • Lake Station Ambulance
  • Lakeshore EMS
  • LaPorte County EMS
  • Lutheran Hospital- Fort Wayne 
  • Madison Township VFD
  • Marion General Hospital EMS
  • Memorial Hospital Ambulance
  • Memorial MedFlight
  • Medic On-Site Services
  • Memorial Hospital Ambulance
  • Middlebury Township Fire Department
  • Midwest Ambulance Services
  • Milan Rescue 30
  • Mital Steel Indiana- Hammond
  • Monroeville EMS, Inc.
  • Monticello FD 
  • Moral Township VFD
  • Morgan County Emergency
  • Multi-Township EMS
  • New Carlisle Area Ambulance Service
  • New Caste/Henry Co EMS
  • New Washington VFD
  • Newton County EMS
  • Noblesville FD
  • North East Allen Co. Fire & EMS
  • North Webster/Tippecanoe Township EMS
  • Northwest Ambulance Service
  • Osolo Emergency Medical
  • Parkview Huntington EMS
  • Parkview LaGrange EMS
  • Parkview Noble EMS
  • Parkview Regional Medical Center EMS
  • Perry County Memorial EMS
  • Phi Air Medical StatFlight
  • Pike County EMS
  • Pittsboro Middle Township Fire Department, Inc.
  • Posey County EMS
  • Porter Memorial Hospital EMS
  • Posey County EMS
  • Prairieton Volunteer Fireman's Association, Inc.
  • Priority One
  • Prompt Ambulance Central
  • Putnam County Operations
  • QCA, Inc.
  • Randolph County EMS
  • Richmond FD
  • Ripley County EMS
  • Rush Memorial Hospital EMS
  • Salem Township EMS
  • Scott County EMS
  • Scott Township VFD
  • Seals Ambulance Service
  • Seelyville FD
  • Shelbyville Fire Department
  • Sheridan FD
  • South Bend FD
  • Southern Ripley County
  • Southwest Fire District
  • Southwest Medical Services
  • Southern Ripley County Emergency Life Squad 
  • Speedway Fire Department
  • Spencer County EMS
  • Spirit Medical Transport
  • St. Joseph Township FD
  • St. Mary’s LifeFlight
  • St. Mary’s Warrick EMS
  • Steuben County EMS
  • Sugar Creek Twshp FD
  • Sullivan Co. Ambulance
  • Sullivan FD
  • Sunman Area Life Squad
  • Superior Air-Ground Ambulance Services (Highland)
  • Superior Air-Ground Ambulance Services (Elmhurst)
  • Switzerland County EMS, Inc.
  • Terre Haute FD
  • The Methodist Hospitals EMS
  • Three Rivers Ambulance Authority
  • Thunderbird Fire Protection
  • Tippecanoe EMS
  • Town of Plainfield Fire Territory
  • Town of Schererville
  • Town of St. John
  • Trafalgar Volunteer Fire Department
  • Tri-Creek Ambulance Service
  • Turkey Creek Fire
  • Wabash FD
  • Warren County EMS
  • Washington Twshp/Avon FD
  • Wayne Township Fire Department
  • Wells County EMS
  • Westfield Fire Department 
  • Whiting FD
  • Whitley County EMS
  • Wolcott Ambulance Service
  • Woodburn FD
  • Zionsville VFD, Inc.

The following hospitals have submitted data to the Indiana Trauma Registry for 2014:

  • Cameron Memorial
  • Clark Memorial
  • Columbus Regional
  • Community Anderson
  • Community Bremen
  • Community East
  • Community Howard
  • Community North
  • Community South
  • Daviess Community
  • Deaconess Gateway
  • Deaconess Hospital
  • Dearborn County
  • DeKalb Health
  • Dukes Memorial
  • Dupont Hospital
  • Elkhart General
  • Eskenazi Health
  • Floyd Memorial
  • Gibson General
  • Good Samaritan
  • Greene County
  • Hancock Regional
  • Harrison County
  • Hendricks Regional
  • Henry County Memorial
  • IU Health—Arnett
  • IU Health—Ball Memorial
  • IU Health—Bedford
  • IU Health—Blackford
  • IU Health—Bloomington
  • IU Health—Goshen
  • IU Health—LaPorte
  • IU Health—Methodist
  • IU Health—Morgan
  • IU Health—North
  • IU Health—Paoli
  • IU Health—Riley
  • IU Health - Tipton
  • IU Health—White Memorial
  • Jasper County
  • Jay County
  • Johnson Memorial
  • King’s Daughters’ Health
  • Kosciusko Community
  • Lutheran Hospital
  • Major Hospital
  • Margaret Mary Hospital
  • Marion General
  • Memorial Hospital (Jasper)
  • Memorial Hospital (Logansport)
  • Memorial South Bend
  • Methodist—Northlake
  • Methodist—Southlake
  • Monroe Hospital
  • Parkview Huntington
  • Parkview LaGrange
  • Parkview Noble
  • Parkview Randallia
  • Parkview Regional Medical Center
  • Parkview Whitley
  • Perry County Memorial
  • Portage Hospital
  • Porter—Valparaiso
  • Pulaski Memorial
  • Putnam County
  • Reid Hospital
  • Rush Memorial
  • Schneck Medical Center
  • Scott County Memorial
  • St. Anthony—Crown Point
  • St. Anthony—Michigan City
  • St. Catherine Regional (Charlestown) 
  • St. Elizabeth—Central
  • St. Elizabeth—Crawfordsville
  • St. Elizabeth—East
  • St. Francis—Indianapolis
  • St. Francis—Mooresville
  • St. Joseph Regional Medical Center —Mishawaka
  • St. Joseph Regional Medical Center - Plymouth
  • St. Margaret—Dyer
  • St. Margaret -Hammond 
  • St. Mary’s of Evansville
  • St. Mary’s Warrick
  • St. Vincent Anderson
  • St. Vincent Clay
  • St. Vincent Indianapolis
  • St. Vincent Mercy
  • St. Vincent Salem
  • St. Vincent Williamsport
  • Sullivan County Community
  • Terre Haute Regional
  • Union (Clinton)
  • Union (Terre Haute)
  • Witham
  • Witham at Anson
  • Woodlawn

The following rehabilitation hospitals have submitted data to the Indiana Trauma Registry for 2014:

  • Community Health Network

  • Community Howard

  • Rehabiltiation Hospital of Fort Wayne

  • Rehabilitation Hospital of Indianapolis

  • Franciscan St. Elizabeth

Eskenazi's 21st Annual Trauma & Critical Care Symposium, October 24

Eskenazi Health’s 21st Annual Trauma & Critical Care Symposium is October 24 from 7:15 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at the Rapp Family Conference Center, Eskenazi Hospital (720 Eskenazi Avenue, Indianapolis, IN 46202). This Symposium is designed to provide physicians, nurses and other health care professionals who care for trauma and critically ill patients with an in-depth look at trauma. Controversial issues as well as advances in diagnosis and management of patients will be discussed in this symposium. Lectures will be presented by national and international faculty who specialize in trauma surgery and critical care.

To register, visit: http://cmetracker.net/IUPUICME/Login?FormName=RegLoginLive&Eventid=154358

Trauma Staffing Changes

Ramzi Nimry joined the ISDH Trauma Program as the Trauma System Performance Improvement  Manager.  He graduated from Indiana University (IUPUI) with a Bachelor of Arts in Communication Studies and a minor in Psychology.  He spent three years with Family Social Services Administration,  Division of Mental Health and Addiction, and almost two years with the Regenstrief Institute (within the IU Center for Aging Research) prior to joining ISDH.

Ramzi can be reached via email rnimry@isdh.in.gov or by phone, 317-234-7321.

Calendar of Events

The ISDH Division of Trauma and Injury Prevention Event Calendar is available at: http://www.in.gov/isdh/26125.htm.

A calendar of educational events from around the state is available at: http://www.in.gov/isdh/25966.htm.

Trauma Times Survey

Trauma Times wants your feedback! Please take this short survey to help us serve your needs: http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/WYY6TRJ

New Trauma Registry Reports

The Indiana Trauma Registry produces regular reports on a monthly, quarterly, and annual basis. In addition, certain ad hoc reports are produced upon request. These reports are archived on our web page.

 

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