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Pollution Prevention

Pollution Prevention > CLEAN Community Challenge > CLEAN Communities Financial Assistance CLEAN Communities Financial Assistance

There are many financial resources that you can find to aid you in meeting the CLEAN Community Challenge. Select a Grant or Loan from the list below to find out more about available assistance that may meet your needs:

Federal Grants and Loans

  • Catalog of Federal Funding Sources for Watershed Protection:
    • A searchable, interactive Web site to support watershed stakeholders' efforts to secure funding to implement watershed protection projects.
  • Clean Cities:
    • The Clean Cities program is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and promotes the use of alternative-fuel vehicles and the development of a refueling infrastructure. The program aids in the development of public/private partnerships to help communities clean their air.
  • Clean School Bus USA:
    • Contains information about EPA's Clean School Bus USA program with a focus on sources of funding. School buses are the safest way for children to get to school. However, pollution from diesel vehicles has health implications for everyone, especially children. Clean School Bus USA is an initiative sponsored by EPA to help communities to reduce pollution from school buses. To date, Congress has provided ten million dollars in grant funding to help communities replace or upgrade their school bus fleets. In addition, some school bus retrofit programs have been funded through state-negotiated settlements in legal actions against companies that violated state environmental laws. Contact your state environmental agency about the possibility of receiving money resulting from an enforcement action.
  • Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF):
    • Provides information on the CWSRF programs, which operate much like environmental infrastructure banks that are capitalized with federal and state contributions. CWSRF monies are loaned to communities and loan repayments are recycled back into the program to fund additional water quality protection projects. The revolving nature of these programs provides for an ongoing funding source that will last far into the future. States have the flexibility to target resources to their particular environmental needs, including contaminated runoff from urban and agricultural areas, wetlands restoration, groundwater protection, brownfields remediation, estuary management, and wastewater treatment.
  • Community Assistance Program:
    • Provides information that may be useful to communities such as: information on chemicals and their effects, tools to help understand and use environmental data, programs and solutions to concerns about chemicals, grants to support community initiatives, forums for Tribes and Environmental Justice communities, and related Programs.
  • Drinking Water State Revolving Fund:
    • Provides information on the Drinking Water State Revolving Fund. The fund makes money available to drinking water systems to finance infrastructure improvements. The program also emphasizes providing funds to small and disadvantaged communities and to programs that encourage pollution prevention as a tool for ensuring safe drinking water.
  • Environmental Finance Program:
    • Assists communities in their search for creative approaches to funding their environmental projects.
  • Federal Government Grants:
    • Allows organizations to electronically find and apply for competitive grant opportunities from all Federal grant funding agencies.
  • Funding for Source Water Protection Activities:
    • Provides a listing of Federal resources that can be used to protect drinking water sources.
  • Office of Air and Radiation:
    • Lists all of OAR's grants, cooperative agreements, and other assistance agreement vehicles that are subject to the Agency's competition policy. OAR grants and other funding opportunities are posted as they become available. The site also contains assistance in the form of an Application Kit, which includes application forms and other information and a Grant Writing Tutorial is also available to assist you in applying for these grants. While the site does contain a tutorial, it is best suited to someone familiar with federal grants and funding projects.
  • Office of Environmental Justice's Small Grants Program:
    • Provides financial assistance to eligible community groups working on or planning to carry out projects to address environmental justice issues.
  • PestWise EPA Partnership Program:
    • Provides grants for exploring innovative practices, technologies and regulatory solutions to promote Integrated Pest Management (IPM) adoption.
  • Smart Growth in Brownfield Communities:
    • The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is supporting the efforts of communities to incorporate smart growth principles into their planning, revitalization, and/or redevelopment efforts. EPA's Smart Growth in Brownfield Communities grants are an important component of this work. Smart growth is development that grows the economy, enhances the community, and protects public health and the environment. Two funding resource documents are available:
  • Transportation Enhancement Program:
    • The annual Transportation Enhancements (TE) program provides assistance for community-based projects that expand travel choices and enhance the transportation experience by improving the cultural, historic, aesthetic and environmental aspects of our transportation infrastructure. TE projects must fall into one of 12 eligible categories and must relate to surface transportation. For example, projects can include creation of bicycle and pedestrian facilities, streetscape improvements, rehabilitation of historic transportation facilities, and other investments that enhance communities and access. The federal government provides funding for TE projects through our nation's surface transportation legislation.
  • Urban Initiative Program:
    • EPA awards grants under the Urban Initiative, which grew out of the agricultural pesticide, methyl parathion, misuse in states like Mississippi and Tennessee. Urban Initiative dollars are used on projects that help prevent agricultural pesticide misuse in the urban setting. The grants have also addressed the area of unregistered, illegal pesticides imported into the U.S. for use in homes.
  • Voluntary Diesel Retrofit Program:
    • Helps to reduce pollution from large diesel vehicles and equipment in use today. This program complements EPA's regulations, which will dramatically reduce pollution from new diesel trucks, buses, and non-road equipment. Grant funds are periodically available to assist communities in implementing retrofit and replacement projects, including installation of pollution control hardware and use of cleaner fuels.

State Grants and Loans

Alternative Fuel Grants

  • Federal Income Tax Credits:
    • Federal Income Tax Credits exist for the installation of alternative fuel systems. The infrastructure development provision was part of the 2005 Energy Policy Act and provides a 30% federal income tax credit, up to $30,000 per property, to install alternative fuel dispensing systems.

Brownfield Redevelopment

  • Indiana Brownfields Program:
    • The Indiana Brownfields Program offers financial assistance primarily to qualifying political subdivisions (as defined by Indiana Code 13-11-2-164(c)) in Indiana to assess, demolish and remediate brownfield sites.

Community Development Tax Credits & Grants

  • Community Focus Fund:
    • CFF Grants are funded with Federal Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) dollars from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). The goal of the CFF program is to encourage communities with eligible populations to focus on long-term community development.
  • Industrial Recovery Tax Credit:
    • The Industrial Recovery tax credit provides an incentive to invest in facilities requiring significant rehabilitation or remodeling expense. After a building has been designated as an industrial recovery site, companies may be eligible for a tax credit calculated as a percentage of qualified rehabilitation expense.
  • Tourism Attraction Signs:
    • In cooperation with the Indiana Department of Transportation, the Office of Tourism is able to provide directional signs to attractions with cultural, educational or recreational significance. Qualified attractions must maintain regular hours, meet minimum attendance requirements, and bear the cost of sign production and installation.

Drinking Water Loans

  • State Revolving Fund (SRF) Loan Program:
    • Provides low-interest loans to Indiana communities for projects that improve drinking water infrastructure. The Indiana Department of Environmental Management (IDEM) and Indiana State Budget Agency work together to protect public health and the environment through the administering of this program. Any project with an existing pollution abatement need is eligible for SRF funding. Eligible projects include: Treatment plant improvements, water line extensions to non-served properties, and water storage facilities.

Energy Efficiency Grants & Loans

  • Alternative Power and Energy Grant Program:
    • The APE Grant Program will provide cost share grants to Indiana's public, non-profit, commercial, industrial and agricultural sectors for the purchase and installation of alternative energy systems.

Forestry

  • Community Forestry Grant Programs:
    • Cities, towns and non-profit organizations can receive funding to enhance urban trees and forests. The Indiana Department of Natural Resources (DNR), Division of Forestry offers four grant programs that help improve, protect, maintain and increase the number of trees in Indiana communities. This federal and state funding is provided on an annual basis by the Indiana DNR and the USDA Forest Service.
  • Low-Cost Fire Protection for Rural America:
    • The Federal Excess Personal Property (FEPP) program allows for the screening and acquisition of excess military equipment. FEPP is a cooperative program between the USDA Forest Service, State and Private Forestry, and the Indiana Division of Forestry. This equipment is then made available to rural and volunteer fire departments for conversion to firefighting apparatus. This equipment includes vehicles, generators, and fire equipment. More information is available at the Fire Management link on the Indiana Department of Natural Resources website.

Historic Preservation Grants

  • Historic Preservation Fund Matching Grants Program:
    • The Historic Preservation Fund (HPF) is an annual program that provides assistance for local cultural heritage projects. Eligible projects include surveys to identify historic sites and structures, surveys to identify and investigate archaeological resources, nominations to the National Register of Historic Places for local historic districts, architectural plans for rehabilitation projects, public education projects focused on preservation and archaeology, and rehabilitation of National Register-listed properties. Eligible applicants include municipal governments, educational institutions, and not-for-profit organizations, which must supply a 50 percent local match to the federal 50 percent grant.

Land and Water Preservation / Park and Recreation Development

  • Heritage Trust Fund:
    • Project types eligible for funding under the Indiana Heritage Trust include the acquisition of property for new and existing state parks, state forests, nature preserves, fish and wildlife areas, and outdoor recreation, historic, or archaeological sites. Projects must fall into one of six categories and ALL projects eligible for funding must meet one or more of the criteria listed for project types.
  • Hoosier Riverwatch:
    • Hoosier Riverwatch is a state sponsored water quality monitoring initiative. The program's goal is to increase public awareness of water quality issues and concerns by training volunteers to monitor stream water quality. Hoosier Riverwatch collaborates with agencies and volunteers to increase public involvement in water quality issues through hands-on training of volunteers in stream monitoring and cleanup activities; educate local communities about the relationship between land use and water quality; and provide water quality information to citizens and governmental agencies working to protect Indiana's rivers and streams.
  • Lake and River Enhancement Program (LARE):
    • The Division of Fish & Wildlife's Lake and River Enhancement Program (LARE) goal is to ensure the continued viability of public-access lakes and streams by utilizing a watershed approach to reduce non-point source sediment and nutrient pollution of Indiana's and adjacent states' surface waters to a level that meets or surpasses state water quality standards. To accomplish this goal, the LARE Program provides technical and financial assistance for qualifying projects.
  • Land and Water Conservation Fund:
    • The LWCF is a matching assistance program that provides grants for 50 percent of the cost for the acquisition and/or development of outdoor recreation sites and facilities. Only park and recreation boards established under Indiana law are eligible. Grant applications may consist of land acquisition and/or facility construction or renovation for local public parks for outdoor recreation. New parks or additions to existing parks may be funded. This program requires a current five-year park and recreation master plan approved by the Indiana Department of Natural Resources Division of Outdoor Recreation.
      • The land acquisition or development may not be started until final approval is received from the federal government. All land to be developed must be controlled by the park board through direct ownership. Examples of types of projects include:
        • Acquiring park or natural area
        • Picnic areas
        • Sports and playfields, such as playgrounds, ball fields, court facilities and golf courses
        • Water oriented facilities for boating, swimming, and access to lakes, rivers, and streams
        • Natural areas and interpretive facilities
        • Campgrounds
        • Fishing and hunting areas
        • Winter sports facilities
        • Amphitheaters and bandstands
        • Parks adjacent to schools for mutual use
        • Outdoor natural habitat zoo facilities
        • Roads, restrooms, utilities, park maintenance buildings
        • Nature Centers
  • Lake Michigan Coastal Program (LMCP):
    • The LMCP is based on a watershed approach and includes those areas that drain into Indiana's portion of Lake Michigan. The LMCP supports coordination and partnerships among local, state, and federal agencies and local organizations for the protection and sustainable use of natural and cultural resources in the Lake Michigan region.

Nonpoint Source Loans

  • State Revolving Fund (SRF) Loan Program:
    • Provides low-interest loans to Indiana communities for water pollution abatement projects. Any project with an existing pollution abatement need is eligible for SRF funding. Eligible projects include treatment plant improvements, water line extensions to non-served properties, and water storage facilities.

Transportation and Trails Grants

  • Land and Water Conservation Fund:
    • The LWCF is a matching assistance program that provides grants for 50 percent of the cost for the acquisition and/or development of outdoor recreation sites and facilities. Only park and recreation boards established under Indiana law are eligible. Grant applications may consist of land acquisition and/or facility construction or renovation for local public parks for outdoor recreation. New parks or additions to existing parks may be funded. This program requires a current five-year park and recreation master plan approved by the Indiana Department of Natural Resources Division of Outdoor Recreation. The land acquisition or development may not be started until final approval is received from the Federal Government. All land to be developed must be controlled by the park board through direct ownership.
      • Examples of types of projects include:
        • Acquiring park or natural area
        • Picnic areas
        • Sports and playfields, such as playgrounds, ball fields, court facilities and golf courses
        • Water oriented facilities for boating, swimming, and access to lakes, rivers, and streams
        • Natural areas and interpretive facilities
        • Campgrounds
        • Fishing and hunting areas
        • Winter sports facilities
        • Amphitheaters and bandstands
        • Parks adjacent to schools for mutual use
        • Outdoor natural habitat zoo facilities
        • Roads, restrooms, utilities, park maintenance buildings
        • Nature Centers
  • Recreational Trails Grant:
    • The Recreational Trails Program is a matching assistance program that provides funding for the acquisition and/or development of multi-use recreational trail projects. Both motorized and non-motorized projects may qualify for assistance. The assistance program is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Transportation's Federal Highway Administration (FHWA).
  • Transportation Enhancement Program:
    • The annual Transportation Enhancements (TE) program provides assistance for community-based projects that expand travel choices and enhance the transportation experience by improving the cultural, historic, aesthetic and environmental aspects of our transportation infrastructure. TE projects must fall into one of 12 eligible categories and must relate to surface transportation. For example, projects can include creation of bicycle and pedestrian facilities, streetscape improvements, rehabilitation of historic transportation facilities, and other investments that enhance communities and access. The federal government provides funding for TE projects through our nation's surface transportation legislation.

CLEAN Community Challenge