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Indiana Commission on the Social Status of Black Males

ICSSBM > Community Action Community Action

The ICSSBM has developed goals and objectives that we are working towards within our communities through our events, awareness outreach, partnerships and public support.

General Community Organizations

  • The Indiana General Assembly should establish incentives for churches and other community entities to develop community outreach programs targeting young Black males.
  • Neighborhood associations should establish partnerships with churches, family and youth-oriented agencies to develop programs such as "For Parents Only" and positive programs for Black youth.
  • A consortium of community organizations should pool their talents and resources to raise the substantial moneys needed to fund male self-development programs.
  • Public and private community entities should increase informational and promotional efforts targeting the Black community, highlighting the high number of Black male children at risk and who are in need of adoption. Examples of such efforts are the Indiana One Church-One Child program and Homes for Black Children of Indianapolis.
  • Public and private community entities should develop support programs to empower parents with acceptable and effective discipline methods without child abuse.
  • Public and private community entities should encourage actively Black male adults to participate in intervention and prevention programs for at-risk young Black males.
  • The private and public sectors of local communities should promote aggressively the spirit of volunteerism and "giving back."
  • Public and private community entities should develop community-based mentoring programs targeting young Black males. One example of such effort is the Boys to Men Mentor Program, Division of Mental Health, Family and Social Services Administration.
  • Social service agencies and health coalitions should establish community outreach programs to teach young Black fathers effective parenting skills and responsibilities.

Churches, Social Service, and Family Support Agencies

  • Churches, social service and family support agencies should form family mentoring partnerships and programs.
  • Churches, social service agencies, and family-support agencies should develop constructive Afrocentric family crisis support programs.
  • Churches, social service and family support agencies should develop community programs and activites for Black males.
  • Churches, social service and family support agencies should encourage the development of effective parenting programs for Black parents.
  • Churches, social service and family support agencies should encourage the development of community-based, family development centers.
  • Churches and other community entities should encourage the Black community to become involved actively in the lives of Black male children. Examples of such efforts include Light of the World Christian Church's The Brotherhood International, Indianapolis; 100 Black Men Coalition of Indianapolis; and the African American Achievers Corporation, Inc., Gary.
  • Churches in conjunction with public and private community entities should establish Rites of Passage programs for young Black males.

School Corporations

  • School corporations, in conjunction with social service and family support agencies, should encourage Black parents to be proactive in educational activities affecting their sons and daughters.
  • School corporations in conjunction with public and private community entities should establish tutoring and mentoring programs linking Black male adults with Black male students.
  • School corporations in conjunction with public and private sectors should develop role modeling programs targeting Black male children ages one through five.
  • School corporations in conjunction with public and private sectors should develop programs teaching the cultural experiences and role of the Black family.
  • School corporations in conjunction with social service and family support agencies, should develop after-school programs for latchkey Black male children.

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