IN.gov - Skip Navigation

Note: This message is displayed if (1) your browser is not standards-compliant or (2) you have you disabled CSS. Read our Policies for more information.

Indiana Historical Bureau

George Rogers Clark > 225th Anniversary Exhibit > Clark and the End of the American Revolution Clark and the End of the American Revolution

Despite the fall of Fort Sackville and the capture of Henry Hamilton, British-sponsored Indian attacks continued. Clark, until the end of the American Revolution in 1783, defended the settlements with little money, supplies, and men.

Historian Claude H. Van Tyne expressed a common opinion: "Clark would have pushed on to capture Detroit also but want of sufficient reinforcements compelled him to be content with holding Vincennes, Cahokia, and Kaskaskia. These posts, however, were sufficient to insure the American hold upon the Northwest" and gain it for America in the Treaty of Paris in 1783.

As quoted in James Alton James, The Life of George Rogers Clark (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1928), p. 284.

225th Anniversary Exhibit