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Indiana Historical Bureau

The Heart of the Community - Bibliography The Heart of the Community - Bibliography

A Note Regarding Resources: Items are listed on this page that enhance work with the topic discussed. Some older items, especially, may include dated practices and ideas that are no longer generally accepted. Resources reflecting current practices are noted whenever possible

Student Reading

Beekman, Dan. Forest, Village, Town, City. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell, 1982.
This work provides delightful drawings which illustrate the development of a city from its earliest settlement. Very readable.

Kalman, Bobbie. Early City Life. New York: Crabtree Publishing Company, 1983.

___________. Early Village Life. New York: Crabtree Publishing Company, 1981.
Kalman investigates the development of both a village and a city in these two volumes of The Early Settler Life Series.
The text is arranged in brief paragraphs with bold headings. The village book is illustrated with drawings; the city book contains old photographs, woodcuts, and drawings.
Each book has an index and a glossary. Interesting and very readable.

Weitzman, David. My Backyard History Book. Boston: Little, Brown and Company, 1975.
Weitzman incorporates interesting activities and projects into the study of local history. Essential for anyone interested in local history.

General Sources

Atherton, Lewis. Main Street on the Middle Border. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1984.
Atherton has written a highly readable account of small towns in the Midwest. He describes towns and daily activities and shows the impact of new means of transportation and industrial growth.

Blumenson, John J. G. Identifying American Architecture: A Pictorial Guide to Styles and Terms, 1600-1945. Nashville: American Association for State and Local History, 1977.
A standard reference for the field.

Danzer, Gerald A. Public Places: Exploring Their History. Nashville: American Association for State and Local History, 1987.
Danzer teaches the history of communities through their monuments, buildings, town plans, streets, and open spaces. He provides a very practical process for teaching and doing local history.

Finney, Jan, ed. Victorian Commercial Architecture in Indiana. Indianapolis: Historic Landmarks Foundation of Indiana, 1978.
A key resource for nineteenth- century Indiana commercial buildings.

Historic Landmarks Foundation of Indiana. Shelby County Interim Report. Indianapolis: Historic Landmarks Foundation of Indiana, 1992.
This report gives a brief contextual and architectural history of the county, listing and describing applicable styles and sites.
It contains a survey of historic sites and structures in urban and rural settings throughout the county. Many photographs, old and new, are included.
These reports are available for many Indiana counties. They are valuable resources.

Phillips, Clifton J. Indiana in Transition: The Emergence of an Industrial Commonwealth, 1880-1920. Indianapolis: Indiana Historical Bureau and Indiana Historical Society, 1968.
An excellent source for information about Indiana in this time period.

Reps, John W. Town Planning in Frontier America. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1969.
Reps’ book continues to be one of the standard histories of town planning during the frontier and early settlement periods. He uses several Indiana and midwest examples.

Of Special Interest

Historic Landmarks Foundation of Indiana, 340 West Michigan Street, Indianapolis, 46202; 317-639-4534.
Historic Landmarks Foundation of Indiana saves and restores endangered historic buildings and educates Hoosiers about the architectural heritage of the state.
Its reference library contains over 3,000 volumes on architecture and historic preservation. Audio-visual materials are available on loan.
Indiana Humanities Council, 1500 North Delaware Street, Indianapolis, 46202; 317-638-1500.
The Resource Center contains architecture kits and audio-visual materials.

Entire Issue

The Heart of the Community