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Indiana Department of Labor

DOL > Child Labor > Child Labor FAQs Child Labor FAQs

  1. Work Permits
  2. Homeschool Students
  3. Out-of-state Students
  4. Actors/Performers/Models/Referees/Umpires
  5. Family-owned Business
  6. Summer/Seasonal Employment
  7. Hours of Work
  8. Prohibited / Hazardous Occupations
  9. Supplies/Posters
  10. Online Work Permit System
  11. Child Labor Investigations

Work Permits

How to obtain

Q: How does a minor obtain a work permit?
A: Nearly all minors ages 14 through 17 who wish to work in Indiana are required to obtain a work permit. Work permits are obtained from the accredited high school in the school district where the minor resides. To obtain a work permit, a minor must first be hired by an employer. The employer must provide the accredited school with written notice that they intend to hire the minor, as well as the hours the minor will work and the types of duties the minor will perform. To streamline the process, the Indiana Department of Labor has developed the "Intent to Employ/A1" form which includes all of the information an employer will need to provide. The minor must then return the notice, in person, to the Issuing Officer at the accredited high school. The minor will also need to provide proof of age--traditionally by presenting a copy of his/her birth certificate. If the minor does not attend the accredited high school or is homeschooled, the minor may be required to provide a letter from his/her school stating that the minor is in good academic and attendance standing. Once these documents are examined and found to be in good order, the minor should be issued a work permit. There is no cost associated with filing for or issuing a work permit. The work permit must remain on file at the site where the minor is working.

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Q: Can a school refuse to issue a work permit simply because the minor does not attend that school?
A: No. This is not a sufficient reason to deny a work permit. A minor must obtain a work permit from an accredited school in the school district where he/she resides. Sometimes the minor may not attend that school due to late-year transfer, homeschooling, private schooling, withdrawal, etc. The issuing school may request a copy of the minor's transcript and attendance record from his/her current or former school program to verify academic performance and attendance. If the minor's academics or attendance are not up to the school system's standards, the minor may be denied a work permit.

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Q: Where can I get an "Intent to Employ" form?
A: The "Intent to Employ/A1" form is a form that the employer is required to complete. The school will require that this form be completed before issuing a Work Permit. This form is available online at www.in.gov/dol/2400.htm .

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Q: Where should a minor's Work Permit be filed?
A: The Work Permit must remain on file at the location of the minor's employment. For example, if the minor works in a restaurant, the original copy of the Work Permit must stay on file in that restaurant for the duration of the minor's employment.

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Q: How does a homeschool student obtain a work permit?
A: Nearly all minors ages 14 through 17 who wish to work in Indiana are required to obtain a work permit. Work permits are obtained from the accredited high school in the school district where the minor resides. To obtain a work permit, a minor must first be hired by an employer. The employer must provide the accredited school with written notice that they intend to hire the minor, as well as the hours the minor will work and the types of duties the minor will perform. To streamline the process, the Indiana Department of Labor has developed the "Intent to Employ/A1" form which includes all of the information an employer will need to provide. The minor must then return the notice, in person, to the Issuing Officer at the accredited high school. The minor will also need to provide proof of age--traditionally by presenting a copy of his/her birth certificate. If the minor does not attend the accredited high school or is homeschooled, the minor may be required to provide a letter from his/her school stating that the minor is in good academic and attendance standing. Once these documents are examined and found to be in good order, the minor should be issued a work permit. There is no cost associated with filing for or issuing a work permit. The work permit must remain on file at the site where the minor is working.

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Q: If I hire a minor from out-of-state, where would he/she obtain a work permit?
A: Work permits for out-of-state minors may be obtained at the accredited high school in the school district where the employer is located. He/she will need to bring proof of age (i.e. State ID, birth certificate, etc.) to the issuing officer at the accredited school. By law, the minor must appear before the issuing officer. This process cannot be completed by a parent or over the phone. The minor will also be required to present an "Intent to Employ/A1" form to the school issuing officer. This is a form that the employer must fill out and sign detailing where and what hours you will be working. If you are not a student at the school where you are applying for a work permit, you may be required to provide a written statement from your school stating that your attendance and academics are in good standing.

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Q: Schools are out of session for fall/winter/spring/summer break. Where can I obtain a work permit?
A: During break periods, each school system should have an office open for issuing work permits. Please contact your school administration offices to find out where a minor may obtain a work permit.

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Q: My high school principal refuses to issue a work permit for me. What can I do?
A: Work Permits are issued through accredited schools in Indiana. These schools have total discretion to refuse or revoke a work permit based on poor academics or attendance. If your school refuses your work permit for these reasons, there is no other office or agency that may issue the work permit. If you feel this rule is being applied unfairly, we would recommend speaking with the school principal or contacting the superintendent or the school board for the school district. If the high school is refusing to issue the work permit for any other reason besides academics or attendance, please contact the Bureau of Child Labor by phone at (317) 232-2655 or by e-mail at childlabor@dol.in.gov .

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Q: The high school refuses to issue a work permit for me since I do not attend that school. What can I do?
A: Indiana's Child Labor laws give most of the authority for issuing a work permit to the school issuing officer. An issuing officer may deny a work permit if a student's attendance is not in good standing or his or her academic performance does not meet the school corporation's standard. A school should not necessarily deny issuing a work permit simply because a minor is not a student at the school. If the school is refusing based upon your not being a student with that school, please contact the Bureau of Child Labor by e-mail at childlabor@dol.in.gov or by phone at (317) 232-2655.

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Q: How many work permits may a minor hold?
A: In 2006, the Child Labor laws were changed to allow a minor to hold more than one work permit as long as his/her employment does not extend past the work hour restrictions for his/her age. For more information regarding the teen work hour restrictions, please see the Frequently Asked Questions at http://www.in.gov/dol/2398.htm#B127 .

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Q: Where do I send the Termination Notice once a minor has separated from employment?
A: If a minor in your business has quit, stopped showing up or been fired, the issuing officer at the school that issued the work permit must be notified immediately and in writing. This is typically done using the Termination Notice attached to the Work Permit. Please mail, fax or hand deliver the Termination Notice back to the school that issued the work permit.

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Q: How long should an employer retain a minor's work permit after he/she terminates employment?
A: Although there is no specific law regarding how long a work permit must be kept, we recommend keeping the Work Permit on file with the minor's other employment records. At minimum, best practice is to keep the Work Permit for two years.

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Q: What is the "Online Work Permit System?"
A: The "Online Work Permit System" is used by accredited high schools in Indiana to issue Work Permits to minors seeking employment. This system is designed to replace much of the paperwork and postage required by the old "green form" system. The system is fully automated and allows schools to issue work permits quickly and with on-hand supplies. The data included in the work permit system is an invaluable tool used frequently by the Indiana Department of Labor for compiling teen labor reports.

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When are they required?

Q: Do all minors need a work permit?
A: Nearly all minors ages 14 through 17, regardless of their attendance in a public school, must obtain a work permit before beginning work or participating in any training. Exceptions for this rule include minors working as:

  • farm laborers
  • domestic workers (babysitters)
  • golf caddies
  • newspaper carriers
  • performers
  • actors
  • models
  • certified sports referees, umpires or officials (see related FAQs)

If the minor has been legally emancipated, has graduated from high school (or its equivalency) or if the minor will be working for a business that is solely-owned by a parent, he/she is not required to obtain a work permit.

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Q: Are work permits required for minors working as sports referees, umpires or officials?
A: In many instances, no. On April 9, 2013, Indiana passed a law to allow minors 12 years of age and older to officiate, umpire or referee sporting events. Youth referees, umpires and officials are not required to obtain a work permit if the following criteria are met:

  • The minor must be at least twelve (12) years of age.
  • The minor must be certified through a national certification program.
  • The minor may only officiate games for age brackets younger than the minor’s age.
  • The minor must work with someone who is at least 18 years of age and who is working at the same athletic event.
  • Parental permission must be on file with the person responsible for assigning the child to officiate.

Youth referees employed under these laws are not required to obtain a work permit and are exempt from Indiana’s hour restrictions and break rules for minors. These minors are required to be paid in accordance with Indiana’s minimum wage law. A link to the minimum wage poster may be found online at http://www.in.gov/dol/files/Indiana2009MinimumWage.pdf .

If these criteria are not met in full, the minor is required to follow all of the same Child Labor laws as a minor working in another occupation (i.e. age limits, hour restrictions, break rules, work permit requirements, etc.)

This change only affects Indiana state law. Federal law may cover some minors working as youth referees. For clarification on how federal law applies to youth referees, please contact the United States Department of Labor at (317) 226-6801.

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Q: Can a minor work for me if he/she doesn't have a Work Permit?
A: In general, no. A minor may not work or attend paid training until he/she has obtained a work permit. There are, however, a few exceptions. If a minor is working as a farm laborer, domestic worker, golf caddie, newspaper carrier, performer/actor/model, certified sports referee/umpire/official (see related FAQs), or if the minor is legally emancipated, a high school graduate (or equivalent) or employed by his or her own parent who is the sole proprietor of a business, the minor is exempt from obtaining a work permit.

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Q: Do minors need to have work permits to work during the summer?
A: Yes. Minors are still required to obtain a work permit for summer employment. During the summer months, each school system will have an office open for the issuing work permits. Please contact your school administration offices to find out where a minor may obtain a work permit.

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Q: Are Work Permits required for homeschool students?
A: Nearly all minors ages 14 through 17, regardless of their attendance in a public school, must obtain a work permit before beginning work or participating in any training. Exceptions for this rule include minors working as:

  • farm laborers
  • domestic workers (babysitters)
  • golf caddies
  • newspaper carriers
  • performers
  • actors
  • models
  • certified sports referees, umpires or officials (see related FAQs)

If the minor has been legally emancipated, has graduated from high school (or its equivalency) or if the minor will be working for a business that is solely-owned by a parent, he/she is not required to obtain a work permit.

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Q: Are Work Permits required for minors from out-of-state?
A: Nearly all minors ages 14 through 17, even if they do not attend school in Indiana, must obtain a work permit before beginning work or participating in any training. Exceptions for this rule include minors working as:

  • farm laborers
  • domestic workers (babysitters)
  • golf caddies
  • newspaper carriers
  • performers
  • actors
  • models
  • certified sports referees, umpires or officials (see related FAQs)

If the minor has been legally emancipated, has graduated from high school (or its equivalency) or if the minor will be working for a business that is solely-owned by a parent, he/she is not required to obtain a work permit.

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Q: If I withdraw/drop-out from high school, do I still need a work permit?
A: Yes. Unless a minor is a high school graduate (or equivalent), legally emancipated, working for a parent who is the sole proprietor of a business, or working as a farm laborer, domestic worker, golf caddie, newspaper carrier, performer/actor/model or certified sports referee/umpire/official (see related FAQs), the minor is required to obtain a work permit.

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Q: Is a minor who volunteers for a business still subject to the Child Labor laws?
A: Minors may volunteer for non-profit businesses in Indiana. These minors may not be compensated as part of their activities and may only volunteer for registered non-profit organizations. Minors who volunteer are exempt from obtaining a work permit and are not required to adhere to the hour restrictions or the break rules. They must, however, still avoid working in any prohibited or hazardous occupations as defined by the United States Department of Labor and the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). A list of these occupations may be found online at http://www.in.gov/dol/2741.htm .

Entities that wish to allow minors to volunteer should contact the Indiana Department of Labor by phone at (317) 232-2655 option 2 or by e-mail at childlabor@dol.in.gov for clarification of these rules. It would be advisable to also contact the United States Department of Labor at (317) 226-6801 to seek their opinion regarding the applicability of federal child labor laws.

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Minors under 14 years of age

Q: Can a minor work for me if he/she is under the age of 14?
A: In general, no. Most occupations in Indiana require that a minor be at least 14 years of age. There are, however, a few exceptions. If a minor is working as a farm laborer, domestic worker, golf caddie, newspaper carrier, performer/actor, certified sports referee/umpire official (see related FAQs), or if the minor is legally emancipated, he/she may be permitted to work under the age of 14. Even if the minor is working for a parent, he/she must be at least 14 years old to perform any job other than those listed above.

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Q: Can my son/daughter work in my business if he/she is under 14 years of age?
A: In most cases, no. In Indiana, a minor must be at least 14 years of age before beginning work in an established business even if he/she will be working for his/her parent. The only jobs available to someone under the age of 14 are actor, performer, model, golf caddie, newspaper carrier, domestic service worker (babysitter), farm laborer or certified sports referee, umpire or official (see related FAQs).

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More than one Work Permit

Q: How many work permits may a minor hold?
A: In 2006, the Child Labor laws were changed to allow a minor to hold more than one work permit as long as his/her employment does not extend past the work hour restrictions for his/her age. For more information regarding the teen work hour restrictions, please see the Frequently Asked Questions at http://www.in.gov/dol/2398.htm#B127 .

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Q: If a minor has multiple work permits and is working too many hours between both jobs, who gets penalized?
A: It would be very difficult for an employer to know another employer's scheduling habits so, if a minor is found to be working too many hours between two separate employers (e.g. a retail establishment and a separate restaurant), the Indiana Department of Labor may revoke the minor's work permit(s). Unless the minor is working too many hours for one particular employer, neither employer would be in violation. For more information regarding the teen work hour restrictions, please see the Frequently Asked Questions at http://www.in.gov/dol/2398.htm#B127 .

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Homeschool Students

Obtaining a work permit

Q: Are Work Permits required for homeschool students?
A: All minors ages 14 through 17, regardless of their attendance in a public school, must obtain a work permit before beginning work or participating in any training. Exceptions for this rule include minors working as:

  • farm laborers
  • domestic workers (babysitters)
  • golf caddies
  • newspaper carriers
  • performers
  • actors
  • models
  • certified sports referees, umpires or officials (see related FAQs)

If the minor has been legally emancipated, has graduated from high school (or its equivalency) or if the minor will be working for a business that is solely-owned by a parent, he/she is not required to obtain a work permit.

Back to Top

Q: How does a homeschool student obtain a work permit?
A: Nearly all minors ages 14 through 17 who wish to work in Indiana are required to obtain a work permit. Work permits are obtained from the accredited high school in the school district where the minor resides. To obtain a work permit, a minor must first be hired by an employer. This employer must provide the accredited school with written notice that they intend to hire the minor, as well as the hours the minor will work and the types of duties the minor will perform. To streamline the process, the Indiana Department of Labor has developed the "Intent to Employ/A1" form which includes all of the information an employer will need to provide. The minor must then return the notice, in person, to the Issuing Officer at the accredited high school. The minor will also need to provide proof of age--traditionally a copy of his/her birth certificate. If the minor does not attend the accredited high school, the minor may be required to provide a letter from his/her school stating that the minor is in good academic and attendance standing. In the case of a homeschool student, the parent, tutor or proctor of the homeschool program may issue this letter of academic and attendance standing. Once these documents are examined and found to be in good order, the minor should be issued a work permit. There is no cost associated with filing for or issuing a work permit. The work permit must remain on file at the site where the minor is working.

Back to Top

Q: Can a school refuse to issue a work permit simply because the minor does not attend that school?
A: No. This is not a sufficient reason to deny a work permit. A minor must obtain a work permit from an accredited school in the school district where he/she resides. Sometimes the minor may not attend that school due to late-year transfer, homeschooling, private schooling, withdrawal, etc. The issuing school may request a copy of the minor's transcript and attendance record from his/her current or former school program to verify academic performance and attendance. If the minor's academics or attendance are not up to the school system's standards, the minor may be denied a work permit.

Back to Top

Q: I am a homeschooling parent. Can I issue a Work Permit for my child?
A: No. Work permits are issued through accredited schools in Indiana. We typically recommend obtaining a work permit for a homeschool student through the public high school that the minor would regularly attend.

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Q: Where can I get an "Intent to Employ" form?
A: The "Intent to Employ/A1" form is a form that the employer is required to complete. The school will require that this form be completed before issuing a Work Permit. This form is available online at www.in.gov/dol/2400.htm .

Back to Top

Q: Schools are out of session for fall/winter/spring/summer break. Where can I obtain a work permit?
A: During break periods, each school system should have an office open for issuing work permits. Please contact your school administration offices to find out where a minor may obtain a work permit.

Back to Top

Q: Is a minor who volunteers for a business still subject to the Child Labor laws?
A: Minors may volunteer for non-profit businesses in Indiana. These minors may not be compensated as part of their activities and may only volunteer for registered non-profit organizations. Minors who volunteer are exempt from obtaining a work permit and are not required to adhere to the hour restrictions or the break rules. They must, however, still avoid working in any prohibited or hazardous occupations as defined by the United States Department of Labor and the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). A list of these occupations may be found online at http://www.in.gov/dol/2741.htm .

Entities that wish to allow minors to volunteer should contact the Indiana Department of Labor by phone at (317) 232-2655 option 2 or by e-mail at childlabor@dol.in.gov for clarification of these rules. It would be advisable to also contact the United States Department of Labor at (317) 226-6801 to seek their opinion regarding the applicability of federal child labor laws.

Back to Top

Q: How many work permits may a minor hold?
A: In 2006, the Child Labor laws were changed to allow a minor to hold more than one work permit as long as his/her employment does not extend past the work hour restrictions for his/her age. For more information regarding the teen work hour restrictions, please see the Frequently Asked Questions at http://www.in.gov/dol/2398.htm#B127 .

Back to Top

Q: The high school refuses to issue a work permit for me since I do not attend that school. What can I do?
A: Indiana's Child Labor laws give most of the authority for issuing a work permit to the school issuing officer. An issuing officer may deny a work permit if a student's attendance is not in good standing or his or her academic performance does not meet the school corporation's standard. A school should not necessarily deny issuing a work permit simply because a minor is not a student at the school. If the school is refusing based upon your not being a student with that school, please contact the Bureau of Child Labor by e-mail at childlabor@dol.in.gov or by phone at (317) 232-2655.

Back to Top

Q: The principal at the accredited high school refuses to issue a work permit for me. What can I do?
A: Work Permits are issued through accredited schools in Indiana. These schools have total discretion to refuse or revoke a work permit based on poor academics or attendance. If your school refuses your work permit for these reasons, there is no other office or agency that may issue the work permit. If you feel this rule is being applied unfairly, we would recommend speaking with the school principal or contacting the superintendent or the school board for the school district. If the high school is refusing to issue the work permit for any other reason besides academics or attendance, please contact the Bureau of Child Labor by phone at (317) 232-2655 or by e-mail at childlabor@dol.in.gov .

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Q: Where should a minor's Work Permit be filed?
A: The Work Permit must remain on file at the location of the minor's employment. For example, if the minor works in a restaurant, the original copy of the Work Permit must stay on file in that restaurant for the duration of the minor's employment.

Back to Top

Q: What is the "Online Work Permit System?"
A: The "Online Work Permit System" is used by accredited high schools in Indiana to issue Work Permits to minors seeking employment. This system is designed to replace much of the paperwork and postage required by the old "green form" system. The system is fully automated and allows schools to issue work permits quickly and with on-hand supplies. The data included in the work permit system is an invaluable tool used frequently by the Indiana Department of Labor for compiling teen labor reports.

Back to Top

Work hour restrictions

Q: Do homeschool students have to follow the work hour restrictions?
A: Yes. Homeschool students must follow all of the same rules and restrictions that a student at an accredited school would follow. As the educator, however, permission to work during traditional school hours may be granted by the minor's parent, tutor or homeschool proctor.

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Q: What are Parental Permission Forms? Where can I obtain one?
A: Parental Permission Forms are provided by the Indiana Department of Labor to document extended hours that a parent has authorized a 16 or 17 year old to work. These forms should be kept with the minor's records and are subject to inspection by the Indiana Department of Labor. Written parental permission must be obtained before the minor works any extended hours. These forms may be found online at http://www.in.gov/dol/2400.htm . There is no parental permission that will change the work hour restrictions for minors under 16 years of age.

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Working during a "school day"

Q: Can a homeschool student work during a traditional school day?
A: A homeschool student may work during traditional school hours if he/she has written permission from a parent or homeschool tutor. This permission must be delivered in writing and should specify what hours the minor may work.

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Out-of-state Students

Obtaining a work permit

Q: How does a minor from out-of-state obtain a work permit?
A: Work permits for out-of-state minors may be obtained at the accredited high school in the school district where the employer is located. He/she will need to bring proof of age (i.e. State ID, birth certificate, etc.) to the issuing officer at the accredited school. By law, the minor must appear before the issuing officer. This process cannot be completed by a parent or over the phone. The minor will also be required to present an "Intent to Employ/A1" form to the school issuing officer. This is a form that the employer must fill out and sign detailing where and what hours you will be working. If you are not a student at the school where you are applying for a work permit, you may be required to provide a written statement from your school stating that your attendance and academics are in good standing.

Back to Top

Q: Can a school refuse to issue a work permit simply because the minor does not attend that school?
A: No. This is not a sufficient reason to deny a work permit. A minor must obtain a work permit from an accredited school in the school district where he/she resides. Sometimes the minor may not attend that school due to late-year transfer, homeschooling, private schooling, withdrawal, etc. The issuing school may request a copy of the minor's transcript and attendance record from his/her current or former school program to verify academic performance and attendance. If the minor's academics or attendance are not up to the school system's standards, the minor may be denied a work permit.

Back to Top

Q: What is the "Online Work Permit System?"
A: The "Online Work Permit System" is used by accredited high schools in Indiana to issue Work Permits to minors seeking employment. This system is designed to replace much of the paperwork and postage required by the old "green form" system. The system is fully automated and allows schools to issue work permits quickly and with on-hand supplies. The data included in the work permit system is an invaluable tool used frequently by the Indiana Department of Labor for compiling teen labor reports.

Back to Top

Q: If I hire a minor from out-of-state, where would he/she obtain a work permit?
A: Work permits for out-of-state minors may be obtained at the accredited high school in the school district where the employer is located. He/she will need to bring proof of age (i.e. State ID, birth certificate, etc.) to the issuing officer at the accredited school. By law, the minor must appear before the issuing officer. This process cannot be completed by a parent or over the phone. The minor will also be required to present an "Intent to Employ/A1" form to the school issuing officer. This is a form that the employer must fill out and sign detailing where and what hours you will be working. If you are not a student at the school where you are applying for a work permit, you may be required to provide a written statement from your school stating that your attendance and academics are in good standing.

Back to Top

Q: Where can I get an "Intent to Employ" form?
A: The "Intent to Employ/A1" form is a form that the employer is required to complete. The school will require that this form be completed before issuing a Work Permit. This form is available online at www.in.gov/dol/2400.htm .

Back to Top

Q: Schools are out of session for fall/winter/spring/summer break. Where can I obtain a work permit?
A: During break periods, each school system should have an office open for issuing work permits. Please contact your school administration offices to find out where a minor may obtain a work permit.

Back to Top

Q: The high school refuses to issue a work permit for me since I do not attend that school. What can I do?
A: Indiana's Child Labor laws give most of the authority for issuing a work permit to the school issuing officer. An issuing officer may deny a work permit if a student's attendance is not in good standing or his or her academic performance does not meet the school corporation's standard. A school should not necessarily deny issuing a work permit simply because a minor is not a student at the school. If the school is refusing based upon your not being a student with that school, please contact the Bureau of Child Labor by e-mail at childlabor@dol.in.gov or by phone at (317) 232-2655.

Back to Top

Q: The principal at the accredited high school refuses to issue a work permit for me. What can I do?
A: Work Permits are issued through accredited schools in Indiana. These schools have total discretion to refuse or revoke a work permit based on poor academics or attendance. If your school refuses your work permit for these reasons, there is no other office or agency that may issue the work permit. If you feel this rule is being applied unfairly, we would recommend speaking with the school principal or contacting the superintendent or the school board for the school district. If the high school is refusing to issue the work permit for any other reason besides academics or attendance, please contact the Bureau of Child Labor by phone at (317) 232-2655 or by e-mail at childlabor@dol.in.gov .

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Q: Is a minor who volunteers for a business still subject to the Child Labor laws?
A: Minors may volunteer for non-profit businesses in Indiana. These minors may not be compensated as part of their activities and may only volunteer for registered non-profit organizations. Minors who volunteer are exempt from obtaining a work permit and are not required to adhere to the hour restrictions or the break rules. They must, however, still avoid working in any prohibited or hazardous occupations as defined by the United States Department of Labor and the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). A list of these occupations may be found online at http://www.in.gov/dol/2741.htm .

Entities that wish to allow minors to volunteer should contact the Indiana Department of Labor by phone at (317) 232-2655 option 2 or by e-mail at childlabor@dol.in.gov for clarification of these rules. It would be advisable to also contact the United States Department of Labor at (317) 226-6801 to seek their opinion regarding the applicability of federal child labor laws.

Back to Top

Q: Where should a minor's Work Permit be filed?
A: The Work Permit must remain on file at the location of the minor's employment. For example, if the minor works in a restaurant, the original copy of the Work Permit must stay on file in that restaurant for the duration of the minor's employment.

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Q: How long should an employer retain a minor's work permit after he/she terminates employment?
A: Although there is no specific law regarding how long a work permit must be kept, we recommend keeping the Work Permit on file with the minor's other employment records. At minimum, best practice is to keep the Work Permit for two years.

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Working in Indiana

Q: The high school refuses to issue a work permit for me since I do not attend that school. What can I do?
A: Indiana's Child Labor laws give most of the authority for issuing a work permit to the school issuing officer. An issuing officer may deny a work permit if a student's attendance is not in good standing or his or her academic performance does not meet the school corporation's standard. A school should not necessarily deny issuing a work permit simply because a minor is not a student at the school. If the school is refusing based upon your not being a student with that school, please contact the Bureau of Child Labor by e-mail at childlabor@dol.in.gov or by phone at (317) 232-2655.

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Working outside of Indiana

Q: Is a minor required to obtain a work permit if he/she is working out-of-state?
A: Work permits issued through Indiana schools are valid only for employers in the state of Indiana. The state where the minor will be working may have a different set of rules. For clarification, please contact the Department of Labor in the state where the minor will be working.

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Q: What Child Labor laws apply to minors working outside the State of Indiana?
A: For clarification of federal Child Labor laws, please visit http://www.youthrules.dol.gov . You may also wish to contact the Department of Labor in the state where the minor will be working to learn about any state laws that apply to the employment of minors.

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Actors/Performers/Models/Referees/Umpires

Work Permit requirements

Q: Is a work permit required for minors working as Actors, Performers or Models?
A: Typically, no. If the minor is working as an Actor, Performer or Model, the minor is not required to obtain a work permit. The nature of the minor's performance may not be detrimental to the safety, health or well-being of the minor. Also, provisions must be made for education equivalent to full-time school attendance in the public schools for children less than 16 years of age.

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Q: Are work permits required for minors working as sports referees, umpires or officials?
A: In many instances, no. On April 9, 2013, Indiana passed a law to allow minors 12 years of age and older to officiate, umpire or referee sporting events. Youth referees, umpires and officials are not required to obtain a work permit if the following criteria are met:

  • The minor must be at least twelve (12) years of age.
  • The minor must be certified through a national certification program.
  • The minor may only officiate games for age brackets younger than the minor’s age.
  • The minor must work with someone who is at least 18 years of age and who is working at the same athletic event.
  • Parental permission must be on file with the person responsible for assigning the child to officiate.

Youth referees employed under these laws are not required to obtain a work permit and are exempt from Indiana’s hour restrictions and break rules for minors. These minors are required to be paid in accordance with Indiana’s minimum wage law. A link to the minimum wage poster may be found online at http://www.in.gov/dol/files/Indiana2009MinimumWage.pdf .

If these criteria are not met in full, the minor is required to follow all of the same Child Labor laws as a minor working in another occupation (i.e. age limits, hour restrictions, break rules, work permit requirements, etc.)

This change only affects Indiana state law. Federal law may cover some minors working as youth referees. For clarification on how federal law applies to youth referees, please contact the United States Department of Labor at (317) 226-6801.

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Q: My son/daughter is working as a model in another state and the agency is requiring a Work Permit. Where can he/she obtain one?
A: Work permits issued through Indiana schools are valid only for employers in the state of Indiana. The state where the minor will be working may have a different set of rules. For clarification, please contact the Department of Labor in the state where the minor will be working.

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Q: Can a school refuse to issue a work permit simply because the minor does not attend that school?
A: No. This is not a sufficient reason to deny a work permit. A minor must obtain a work permit from an accredited school in the school district where he/she resides. Sometimes the minor may not attend that school due to late-year transfer, homeschooling, private schooling, withdrawal, etc. The issuing school may request a copy of the minor's transcript and attendance record from his/her current or former school program to verify academic performance and attendance. If the minor's academics or attendance are not up to the school system's standards, the minor may be denied a work permit.

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Parental supervision

Q: Do I need to accompany my son/daughter to rehearsals, performances and modeling jobs?
A: If the minor is under 16 years of age, he/she must be accompanied by a parent to all performances and rehearsals. Until the minor turns 18, he/she may not perform in a cabaret, dance hall, night club, tavern or other similar place.

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Q: Can another relative or friend accompany my son/daughter to his/her performance?
A: No. Presently, Indiana law requires that the minor's parent accompany a minor under age 16 to all rehearsals and performances. The law only allows for a parent to provide this supervision.

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Hours of work

Q: What hours can my son/daughter work as a performer or model?
A: If a minor is working as an Actor, Performer or Model outside of school hours, and is not engaging in a performance that is detrimental to his/her safety, health or well-being, he/she is not bound to any hour restrictions.

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Q: What hours can my son/daughter work as a sports referee, umpire or sporting official?
A: On April 9, 2013, Indiana passed a law to allow minors 12 years of age and older to officiate, umpire or referee sporting events. Youth referees, umpires and officials are exempt from Indiana’s hour restrictions and break rules for minors if all of the following criteria are met:

  • The minor must be at least twelve (12) years of age.
  • The minor must be certified through a national certification program.
  • The minor may only officiate games for age brackets younger than the minor’s age.
  • The minor must work with someone who is at least 18 years of age and who is working at the same athletic event.
  • Parental permission must be on file with the person responsible for assigning the child to officiate.

Youth referees employed under these laws are not required to obtain a work permit and are exempt from Indiana’s hour restrictions and break rules for minors. These minors are required to be paid in accordance with Indiana’s minimum wage law. A link to the minimum wage poster may be found online at http://www.in.gov/dol/files/Indiana2009MinimumWage.pdf .

If these criteria are not met in full, the minor is required to follow all of the same Child Labor laws as a minor working in another occupation (i.e. age limits, hour restrictions, break rules, work permit requirements, etc.)

This change only affects Indiana state law. Federal law may cover some minors working as youth referees. For clarification on how federal law applies to youth referees, please contact the United States Department of Labor at (317) 226-6801.

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Family-owned Business

Work Permit requirements

Q: Is a minor required to obtain a work permit if he/she is working in his/her parents' business?
A: If the parent is the sole owner of the business, a minor is not required to obtain a work permit. Minors working in businesses that are not solely owned by a parent must still follow all of the applicable Child Labor laws including obtaining a work permit.

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Age requirements

Q: Can my son/daughter work in my business if he/she is under 14 years of age?
A: In most cases, no. In Indiana, a minor must be at least 14 years of age before beginning work in an established business even if he/she will be working for his/her parent. The only jobs available to someone under the age of 14 are actor, performer, model, golf caddie, newspaper carrier, domestic service worker (babysitter), farm laborer or certified sports referee, umpire or official (see related FAQs).

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Q: Can my son/daughter work in a business owned by a family member if he/she is under 14 years of age?
A: In most cases, no. In Indiana, a minor must be at least 14 years of age before beginning work in an established business even if he/she will be working for his/her parent. The only jobs available to someone under the age of 14 are actor, performer, model, golf caddie, newspaper carrier, domestic service worker (babysitter) and farm laborer.

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Prohibited/Hazardous Occupations

Q: If my son/daughter works for my business, is he/she still restricted in what duties they may perform?
A: Yes. Even if you are the sole owner of your business, your son/daughter may not work in any occupation defined in federal law as Prohibited or Hazardous for minors.

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Q: If my son/daughter works for my business, is he/she still restricted in what duties they may perform?
A: Yes. Even if you are the sole owner of your business, your son/daughter may not work in any occupation defined in federal law as Prohibited or Hazardous for minors.

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Summer/Seasonal Employment

Work Permits

Q: Do minors need to have work permits to work during the summer?
A: Yes. Minors are still required to obtain a work permit for summer employment. During the summer months, each school system will have an office open for the issuing work permits. Please contact your school administration offices to find out where a minor may obtain a work permit.

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Q: Schools are out of session for fall/winter/spring/summer break. Where can I obtain a work permit?
A: During break periods, each school system should have an office open for issuing work permits. Please contact your school administration offices to find out where a minor may obtain a work permit.

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Q: Where can I get an "Intent to Employ" form?
A: The "Intent to Employ/A1" form is a form that the employer is required to complete. The school will require that this form be completed before issuing a Work Permit. This form is available online at www.in.gov/dol/2400.htm .

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Q: Can a school refuse to issue a work permit simply because the minor does not attend that school?
A: No. This is not a sufficient reason to deny a work permit. A minor must obtain a work permit from an accredited school in the school district where he/she resides. Sometimes the minor may not attend that school due to late-year transfer, homeschooling, private schooling, withdrawal, etc. The issuing school may request a copy of the minor's transcript and attendance record from his/her current or former school program to verify academic performance and attendance. If the minor's academics or attendance are not up to the school system's standards, the minor may be denied a work permit.

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Q: Is a minor who volunteers for a business still subject to the Child Labor laws?
A: Minors may volunteer for non-profit businesses in Indiana. These minors may not be compensated as part of their activities and may only volunteer for registered non-profit organizations. Minors who volunteer are exempt from obtaining a work permit and are not required to adhere to the hour restrictions or the break rules. They must, however, still avoid working in any prohibited or hazardous occupations as defined by the United States Department of Labor and the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). A list of these occupations may be found online at http://www.in.gov/dol/2741.htm .

Entities that wish to allow minors to volunteer should contact the Indiana Department of Labor by phone at (317) 232-2655 option 2 or by e-mail at childlabor@dol.in.gov for clarification of these rules. It would be advisable to also contact the United States Department of Labor at (317) 226-6801 to seek their opinion regarding the applicability of federal child labor laws.

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Q: If my son/daughter works for my business, is he/she still restricted in what duties they may perform?
A: Yes. Even if you are the sole owner of your business, your son/daughter may not work in any occupation defined in federal law as Prohibited or Hazardous for minors.

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Q: The high school refuses to issue a work permit for me since I do not attend that school. What can I do?
A: Indiana's Child Labor laws give most of the authority for issuing a work permit to the school issuing officer. An issuing officer may deny a work permit if a student's attendance is not in good standing or his or her academic performance does not meet the school corporation's standard. A school should not necessarily deny issuing a work permit simply because a minor is not a student at the school. If the school is refusing based upon your not being a student with that school, please contact the Bureau of Child Labor by e-mail at childlabor@dol.in.gov or by phone at (317) 232-2655.

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Q: Are work permits required for minors working as sports referees, umpires or officials?
A: In many instances, no. On April 9, 2013, Indiana passed a law to allow minors 12 years of age and older to officiate, umpire or referee sporting events. Youth referees, umpires and officials are not required to obtain a work permit if the following criteria are met:

  • The minor must be at least twelve (12) years of age.
  • The minor must be certified through a national certification program.
  • The minor may only officiate games for age brackets younger than the minor’s age.
  • The minor must work with someone who is at least 18 years of age and who is working at the same athletic event.
  • Parental permission must be on file with the person responsible for assigning the child to officiate.

Youth referees employed under these laws are not required to obtain a work permit and are exempt from Indiana’s hour restrictions and break rules for minors. These minors are required to be paid in accordance with Indiana’s minimum wage law. A link to the minimum wage poster may be found online at http://www.in.gov/dol/files/Indiana2009MinimumWage.pdf .

If these criteria are not met in full, the minor is required to follow all of the same Child Labor laws as a minor working in another occupation (i.e. age limits, hour restrictions, break rules, work permit requirements, etc.)

This change only affects Indiana state law. Federal law may cover some minors working as youth referees. For clarification on how federal law applies to youth referees, please contact the United States Department of Labor at (317) 226-6801.

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Q: The principal at the accredited high school refuses to issue a work permit for me. What can I do?
A: Work Permits are issued through accredited schools in Indiana. These schools have total discretion to refuse or revoke a work permit based on poor academics or attendance. If your school refuses your work permit for these reasons, there is no other office or agency that may issue the work permit. If you feel this rule is being applied unfairly, we would recommend speaking with the school principal or contacting the superintendent or the school board for the school district. If the high school is refusing to issue the work permit for any other reason besides academics or attendance, please contact the Bureau of Child Labor by phone at (317) 232-2655 or by e-mail at childlabor@dol.in.gov .

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Q: Where should a minor's Work Permit be filed?
A: The Work Permit must remain on file at the location of the minor's employment. For example, if the minor works in a restaurant, the original copy of the Work Permit must stay on file in that restaurant for the duration of the minor's employment.

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Q: How long should an employer retain a minor's work permit after he/she terminates employment?
A: Although there is no specific law regarding how long a work permit must be kept, we recommend keeping the Work Permit on file with the minor's other employment records. At minimum, best practice is to keep the Work Permit for two years.

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Q: What is the "Online Work Permit System?"
A: The "Online Work Permit System" is used by accredited high schools in Indiana to issue Work Permits to minors seeking employment. This system is designed to replace much of the paperwork and postage required by the old "green form" system. The system is fully automated and allows schools to issue work permits quickly and with on-hand supplies. The data included in the work permit system is an invaluable tool used frequently by the Indiana Department of Labor for compiling teen labor reports.

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Work hour restrictions

Q: What hours may a 14 or 15 year old work?
A: 14 & 15 year olds may work:

  • 3 hours per school day,
  • 8 hours per non-school day,
  • 18 hours per school week,
  • 40 hours per non-school week.
  • They may not work before 7:00 a.m. or after 7:00 p.m., but may work until 9:00 p.m. from June 1st through Labor Day.

* If a minor 14 through 17 years of age works six or more hours in a shift, the employer is required to provide the minor with one or two breaks totaling at least 30 minutes. These breaks may be taken at any point during the minor's shift. Indiana Administrative Code 610 IAC 10-3-2 requires that break logs be maintained by the employer to document all paid and unpaid breaks provided to minor employees.

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Q: What hours may a 16 year old work?
A: 16 year olds may work:

  • 8 hours per day,
  • 30 hours per week,
  • and until 10:00 p.m. on nights followed by a school day.

With parental permission, a 16 year old may work:

  • 9 hours per day,
  • until 12:00 a.m. on nights NOT followed by a school day,
  • 40 hours per school week,
  • and/or 48 hours per non-school week.
  • 16 year olds may not work more than 6 days per employer's work week and may not work before 6:00 am.

If a 16 year old will be working more than 30 hours per week, more than 9 hours per day and/or until midnight during a period when school is not in session (e.g. summer, spring or holiday break), he/she must have parental permission on file prior to working extended hours.

* If a minor 14 through 17 years of age works six or more hours in a shift, the employer is required to provide the minor with one or two breaks totaling at least 30 minutes. These breaks may be taken at any point during the minor's shift. Indiana Administrative Code 610 IAC 10-3-2 requires that break logs be maintained by the employer to document all paid and unpaid breaks provided to minor employees.

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Q: What hours may a 17 year old work?
A: 17 year olds may work:

  • 8 hours per school day,
  • 30 hours per week,
  • and until 10:00 p.m. on nights followed by a school day.

With written parental permission, 17 year olds may work:

  • 9 hours per day,
  • 40 hours per school week,
  • 48 hours per non-school week,
  • until 11:30 p.m. on nights followed by a school day
  • or until 1:00 a.m. on nights followed by a school day, but not on consecutive nights and not more than two school nights per week.
  • A 17 year old employee has no end-hour restriction for days not followed by a school day.
  • 17 year olds may not work more than 6 days per employer's work week and may not begin work before 6:00 a.m. on school days.

If a 17 year old will be working more than 30 hours per week and/or more than 9 hours per day during a period when school is not in session (e.g. summer, spring or holiday break), he/she must have parental permission on file prior to working extended hours.

* If a minor 14 through 17 years of age works six or more hours in a shift, the employer is required to provide the minor with one or two breaks totaling at least 30 minutes. These breaks may be taken at any point during the minor's shift. Indiana Administrative Code 610 IAC 10-3-2 requires that break logs be maintained by the employer to document all paid and unpaid breaks provided to minor employees.

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Q: What are Parental Permission Forms? Where can I obtain one?
A: Parental Permission Forms are provided by the Indiana Department of Labor to document extended hours that a parent has authorized a 16 or 17 year old to work. These forms should be kept with the minor's records and are subject to inspection by the Indiana Department of Labor. Written parental permission must be obtained before the minor works any extended hours. These forms may be found online at http://www.in.gov/dol/2400.htm . There is no parental permission that will change the work hour restrictions for minors under 16 years of age.

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Q: What hours can my son/daughter work as a sports referee, umpire or sporting official?
A: On April 9, 2013, Indiana passed a law to allow minors 12 years of age and older to officiate, umpire or referee sporting events. Youth referees, umpires and officials are exempt from Indiana’s hour restrictions and break rules for minors if all of the following criteria are met:

  • The minor must be at least twelve (12) years of age.
  • The minor must be certified through a national certification program.
  • The minor may only officiate games for age brackets younger than the minor’s age.
  • The minor must work with someone who is at least 18 years of age and who is working at the same athletic event.
  • Parental permission must be on file with the person responsible for assigning the child to officiate.

Youth referees employed under these laws are not required to obtain a work permit and are exempt from Indiana’s hour restrictions and break rules for minors. These minors are required to be paid in accordance with Indiana’s minimum wage law. A link to the minimum wage poster may be found online at http://www.in.gov/dol/files/Indiana2009MinimumWage.pdf .

If these criteria are not met in full, the minor is required to follow all of the same Child Labor laws as a minor working in another occupation (i.e. age limits, hour restrictions, break rules, work permit requirements, etc.)

This change only affects Indiana state law. Federal law may cover some minors working as youth referees. For clarification on how federal law applies to youth referees, please contact the United States Department of Labor at (317) 226-6801.

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Worker safety

Q: Are there any resources that discuss safety when working outdoors?
A: The Indiana Department of Labor has put together some helpful resources online on our "Teen Worker Safety" page at http://www.in.gov/dol/2638.htm . We also have a Teen Worker Safety video available at http://www.in.gov/dol/2400.htm . For specific questions about safety in the workplace, please contact the Indiana Department of Labor's INSafe division by e-mail at insafe@dol.in.gov or by phone at (317) 232-2688.

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Q: Is it legal for someone under 16 to peddle goods/items/services in a public place such as in front of a mall or department store entrance?
A: In most cases, no. Unless the minor is working for a recognized charity, church, school or government entity, and receives no compensation for his/her work, minors under 16 years of age may not participate in "Youth Peddling." This is an issue that arises frequently in the summer and winter months. Minors are often taken from urban areas to more rural or suburban areas to peddle goods or services for unknown or unnamed organizations. In many cases, these minors are well under the legal employment age of 14 and are sometimes being taken across state lines to unfamiliar areas and neighborhoods. Due to the extreme risk involved in this type of activity, Youth peddling was defined as a Prohibited Occupation in 2010 and carries stiff state and federal penalties if employers are found in violation. Some examples of youth peddling include selling candy, magazine subscriptions or coffee as a "fundraiser" for an organization that may not truly exist.

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Q: Is it legal for someone under 16 to sell items/goods/services door-to-door?
A: In most cases, no. Unless the minor is working for a recognized charity, church, school or government entity, and receives no compensation for his/her work, minors under 16 years of age may not participate in "Youth Peddling." This is an issue that arises frequently in the summer and winter months. Minors are often taken from urban areas to more rural or suburban areas to peddle goods or services for unknown or unnamed organizations. In many cases, these minors are well under the legal employment age of 14 and are sometimes being taken across state lines to unfamiliar areas and neighborhoods. Due to the extreme risk involved in this type of activity, Youth peddling was defined as a Prohibited Occupation in 2010 and carries stiff state and federal penalties if employers are found in violation. Some examples of youth peddling include selling candy, magazine subscriptions or coffee as a "fundraiser" for an organization that may not truly exist.

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Hours of Work

14 - 15 Year Olds

Q: What hours may a 14 or 15 year old work?
A: 14 & 15 year olds may work:

  • 3 hours per school day,
  • 8 hours per non-school day,
  • 18 hours per school week,
  • 40 hours per non-school week.
  • They may not work before 7:00 a.m. or after 7:00 p.m., but may work until 9:00 p.m. from June 1st through Labor Day.

* If a minor 14 through 17 years of age works six or more hours in a shift, the employer is required to provide the minor with one or two breaks totaling at least 30 minutes. These breaks may be taken at any point during the minor's shift. Indiana Administrative Code 610 IAC 10-3-2 requires that break logs be maintained by the employer to document all paid and unpaid breaks provided to minor employees.

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Q: What are Parental Permission Forms? Where can I obtain one?
A: Parental Permission Forms are provided by the Indiana Department of Labor to document extended hours that a parent has authorized a 16 or 17 year old to work. These forms should be kept with the minor's records and are subject to inspection by the Indiana Department of Labor. Written parental permission must be obtained before the minor works any extended hours. These forms may be found online at http://www.in.gov/dol/2400.htm . There is no parental permission that will change the work hour restrictions for minors under 16 years of age.

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Q: Can a homeschool student work during a traditional school day?
A: A homeschool student may work during traditional school hours if he/she has written permission from a parent or homeschool tutor. This permission must be delivered in writing and should specify what hours the minor may work.

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Q: Do homeschool students have to follow the work hour restrictions?
A: Yes. Homeschool students must follow all of the same rules and restrictions that a student at an accredited school would follow. As the educator, however, permission to work during traditional school hours may be granted by the minor's parent, tutor or homeschool proctor.

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Q: If a minor has multiple work permits and is working too many hours between both jobs, who gets penalized?
A: It would be very difficult for an employer to know another employer's scheduling habits so, if a minor is found to be working too many hours between two separate employers (e.g. a retail establishment and a separate restaurant), the Indiana Department of Labor may revoke the minor's work permit(s). Unless the minor is working too many hours for one particular employer, neither employer would be in violation. For more information regarding the teen work hour restrictions, please see the Frequently Asked Questions at http://www.in.gov/dol/2398.htm#B127 .

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16 Year Olds

Q: What hours may a 16 year old work?
A: 16 year olds may work:

  • 8 hours per day,
  • 30 hours per week,
  • and until 10:00 p.m. on nights followed by a school day.

With parental permission, a 16 year old may work:

  • 9 hours per day,
  • until 12:00 a.m. on nights NOT followed by a school day,
  • 40 hours per school week,
  • and/or 48 hours per non-school week.
  • 16 year olds may not work more than 6 days per employer's work week and may not work before 6:00 am.

If a 16 year old will be working more than 30 hours per week, more than 9 hours per day and/or until midnight during a period when school is not in session (e.g. summer, spring or holiday break), he/she must have parental permission on file prior to working extended hours.

* If a minor 14 through 17 years of age works six or more hours in a shift, the employer is required to provide the minor with one or two breaks totaling at least 30 minutes. These breaks may be taken at any point during the minor's shift. Indiana Administrative Code 610 IAC 10-3-2 requires that break logs be maintained by the employer to document all paid and unpaid breaks provided to minor employees.

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Q: What are Parental Permission Forms? Where can I obtain one?
A: Parental Permission Forms are provided by the Indiana Department of Labor to document extended hours that a parent has authorized a 16 or 17 year old to work. These forms should be kept with the minor's records and are subject to inspection by the Indiana Department of Labor. Written parental permission must be obtained before the minor works any extended hours. These forms may be found online at http://www.in.gov/dol/2400.htm . There is no parental permission that will change the work hour restrictions for minors under 16 years of age.

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Q: Can a homeschool student work during a traditional school day?
A: A homeschool student may work during traditional school hours if he/she has written permission from a parent or homeschool tutor. This permission must be delivered in writing and should specify what hours the minor may work.

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Q: Do homeschool students have to follow the work hour restrictions?
A: Yes. Homeschool students must follow all of the same rules and restrictions that a student at an accredited school would follow. As the educator, however, permission to work during traditional school hours may be granted by the minor's parent, tutor or homeschool proctor.

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Q: If a minor has multiple work permits and is working too many hours between both jobs, who gets penalized?
A: It would be very difficult for an employer to know another employer's scheduling habits so, if a minor is found to be working too many hours between two separate employers (e.g. a retail establishment and a separate restaurant), the Indiana Department of Labor may revoke the minor's work permit(s). Unless the minor is working too many hours for one particular employer, neither employer would be in violation. For more information regarding the teen work hour restrictions, please see the Frequently Asked Questions at http://www.in.gov/dol/2398.htm#B127 .

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17 Year Olds

Q: What hours may a 17 year old work?
A: 17 year olds may work:

  • 8 hours per school day,
  • 30 hours per week,
  • and until 10:00 p.m. on nights followed by a school day.

With written parental permission, 17 year olds may work:

  • 9 hours per day,
  • 40 hours per school week,
  • 48 hours per non-school week,
  • until 11:30 p.m. on nights followed by a school day
  • or until 1:00 a.m. on nights followed by a school day, but not on consecutive nights and not more than two school nights per week.
  • A 17 year old employee has no end-hour restriction for days not followed by a school day.
  • 17 year olds may not work more than 6 days per employer's work week and may not begin work before 6:00 a.m. on school days.

If a 17 year old will be working more than 30 hours per week and/or more than 9 hours per day during a period when school is not in session (e.g. summer, spring or holiday break), he/she must have parental permission on file prior to working extended hours.

* If a minor 14 through 17 years of age works six or more hours in a shift, the employer is required to provide the minor with one or two breaks totaling at least 30 minutes. These breaks may be taken at any point during the minor's shift. Indiana Administrative Code 610 IAC 10-3-2 requires that break logs be maintained by the employer to document all paid and unpaid breaks provided to minor employees.

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Q: What are Parental Permission Forms? Where can I obtain one?
A: Parental Permission Forms are provided by the Indiana Department of Labor to document extended hours that a parent has authorized a 16 or 17 year old to work. These forms should be kept with the minor's records and are subject to inspection by the Indiana Department of Labor. Written parental permission must be obtained before the minor works any extended hours. These forms may be found online at http://www.in.gov/dol/2400.htm . There is no parental permission that will change the work hour restrictions for minors under 16 years of age.

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Q: Can a homeschool student work during a traditional school day?
A: A homeschool student may work during traditional school hours if he/she has written permission from a parent or homeschool tutor. This permission must be delivered in writing and should specify what hours the minor may work.

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Q: Do homeschool students have to follow the work hour restrictions?
A: Yes. Homeschool students must follow all of the same rules and restrictions that a student at an accredited school would follow. As the educator, however, permission to work during traditional school hours may be granted by the minor's parent, tutor or homeschool proctor.

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Q: If a minor has multiple work permits and is working too many hours between both jobs, who gets penalized?
A: It would be very difficult for an employer to know another employer's scheduling habits so, if a minor is found to be working too many hours between two separate employers (e.g. a retail establishment and a separate restaurant), the Indiana Department of Labor may revoke the minor's work permit(s). Unless the minor is working too many hours for one particular employer, neither employer would be in violation. For more information regarding the teen work hour restrictions, please see the Frequently Asked Questions at http://www.in.gov/dol/2398.htm#B127 .

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Withdrawn/Graduate

Q: If a minor has withdrawn from school or graduated, is he/she still bound by the hour restrictions?
A: If a minor is 16 years of age or older and has withdrawn or graduated from high school, he or she is no longer bound by the Child Labor hour restrictions or break requirements.

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Breaks and Lunches

Q: Do minors have to receive breaks?
A: If an employee under 18 works six or more consecutive hours, he/she must receive one or two breaks totaling at least 30 minutes. Regardless of whether the breaks are paid or unpaid, they must be documented in a break log or otherwise noted in the employee's time punches. Breaks may be provided at any time during the minor's shift, but must be provided while the minor is still on the clock. The minor may not be sent home early in lieu of a break.

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Q: What is a "break log?"
A: A break log is a log sheet where employers keep track of the break times provided to minors. The log could be something as elaborate as a report generated from an electronic time clock or as simple as a hand-written page.

If your business does not have a break log in place, a sample break log may be found online at http://www.in.gov/dol/2400.htm .

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Prohibited / Hazardous Occupations

14 - 15 Year Olds

Q: What jobs are expressly prohibited for 14 and 15 year olds?
A: For a complete listing of Prohibited Occupations for 14 and 15 year olds, please visit www.in.gov/dol/2741.htm and the United States Department of Labor's Youth Rules page at www.youthrules.gov .

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Q: Are 14 and 15 year olds allowed to use a lawn mower or weed cutter?
A: No. Minors 14 and 15 years old are prohibited from operating most power-driven machinery, including lawn mowers, tractors or weed cutters, in conjunction with any business. They may, however, operate many types of office machines and food service machines including milkshake mixers, popcorn poppers and coffee grinders.

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Q: Is it legal for someone under 16 to peddle goods/items/services in a public place such as in front of a mall or department store entrance?
A: In most cases, no. Unless the minor is working for a recognized charity, church, school or government entity, and receives no compensation for his/her work, minors under 16 years of age may not participate in "Youth Peddling." This is an issue that arises frequently in the summer and winter months. Minors are often taken from urban areas to more rural or suburban areas to peddle goods or services for unknown or unnamed organizations. In many cases, these minors are well under the legal employment age of 14 and are sometimes being taken across state lines to unfamiliar areas and neighborhoods. Due to the extreme risk involved in this type of activity, Youth peddling was defined as a Prohibited Occupation in 2010 and carries stiff state and federal penalties if employers are found in violation. Some examples of youth peddling include selling candy, magazine subscriptions or coffee as a "fundraiser" for an organization that may not truly exist.

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Q: Is it legal for someone under 16 to sell items/goods/services door-to-door?
A: In most cases, no. Unless the minor is working for a recognized charity, church, school or government entity, and receives no compensation for his/her work, minors under 16 years of age may not participate in "Youth Peddling." This is an issue that arises frequently in the summer and winter months. Minors are often taken from urban areas to more rural or suburban areas to peddle goods or services for unknown or unnamed organizations. In many cases, these minors are well under the legal employment age of 14 and are sometimes being taken across state lines to unfamiliar areas and neighborhoods. Due to the extreme risk involved in this type of activity, Youth peddling was defined as a Prohibited Occupation in 2010 and carries stiff state and federal penalties if employers are found in violation. Some examples of youth peddling include selling candy, magazine subscriptions or coffee as a "fundraiser" for an organization that may not truly exist.

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Q: Are there any resources that discuss teen worker safety?
A: The Indiana Department of Labor has put together some helpful resources online on our "Teen Worker Safety" page at http://www.in.gov/dol/2638.htm . We also have a Teen Worker Safety video available at http://www.in.gov/dol/2400.htm . For specific questions about safety in the workplace, please contact the Indiana Department of Labor's INSafe division by e-mail at insafe@dol.in.gov or by phone at (317) 232-2688.

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16 - 17 Year Olds

Q: What jobs are considered hazardous for 16 and 17 year olds?
A: For a complete listing of Hazardous Occupations for 16 and 17 year olds, please visit www.in.gov/dol/2741.htm and the United States Department of Labor's Youth Rules page at www.youthrules.gov .

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Q: Are 16 and 17 year olds allowed to use a lawn mower or weed cutter?
A: In most cases, yes. Minors 16 and 17 years old are allowed to use most mowing and weed cutting equipment. Weed cutters, however, must not be outfitted with a saw blade attachment. Push mowers, garden tractors and riding lawn mowers are also allowed, as long as the tractors and riding mowers are not operated on public roadways. Driving the riding mower or tractor on a roadway would be considered operation of a motor vehicle and would be prohibited.

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Q: Are there any resources that discuss teen worker safety?
A: The Indiana Department of Labor has put together some helpful resources online on our "Teen Worker Safety" page at http://www.in.gov/dol/2638.htm . We also have a Teen Worker Safety video available at http://www.in.gov/dol/2400.htm . For specific questions about safety in the workplace, please contact the Indiana Department of Labor's INSafe division by e-mail at insafe@dol.in.gov or by phone at (317) 232-2688.

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Hazardous Occupations in Agriculture

Q: What jobs are considered hazardous for minors working in agriculture?
A: For a complete listing of Hazardous Occupations in agriculture, please visit www.in.gov/dol/2741.htm and the United States Department of Labor's Youth Rules page at www.youthrules.gov .

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Q: Are 16 and 17 year olds allowed to use a lawn mower or weed cutter?
A: In most cases, yes. Minors 16 and 17 years old are allowed to use most mowing and weed cutting equipment. Weed cutters, however, must not be outfitted with a saw blade attachment. Push mowers, garden tractors and riding lawn mowers are also allowed, as long as the tractors and riding mowers are not operated on public roadways. Driving the riding mower or tractor on a roadway would be considered operation of a motor vehicle and would be prohibited.

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Q: Are there any resources that discuss teen worker safety?
A: The Indiana Department of Labor has put together some helpful resources online on our "Teen Worker Safety" page at http://www.in.gov/dol/2638.htm . We also have a Teen Worker Safety video available at http://www.in.gov/dol/2400.htm . For specific questions about safety in the workplace, please contact the Indiana Department of Labor's INSafe division by e-mail at insafe@dol.in.gov or by phone at (317) 232-2688.

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Supplies/Posters

Schools

Q: Where can I order more State Seal stickers for online work permits?
A: The Indiana Department of Labor has discontinued the use, production and shipment of the State Seal stickers. Schools should now use the embossing seal or stamp that they would typically use to validate official transcripts. This stamp or seal should be placed in the top right corner of the work permit that reads "Void Without Proper Validation." Work permits will not be considered valid without this authentication.

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Q: How long is our school required to maintain copies of the Intent to Employ form and/or paper work permit?
A: Indiana law does not specify how long these records should be maintained by a school. We would recommend following the policies set by your school's records retention officer or legal counsel. If your school has no clear policy regarding retaining student work permit records, we recommend keeping the work permit with the minor's student records and retaining those per your school's policies.

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Q: Where can I get an "Intent to Employ" form?
A: The "Intent to Employ/A1" form is a form that the employer is required to complete. The school will require that this form be completed before issuing a Work Permit. This form is available online at www.in.gov/dol/2400.htm .

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Q: Our school needs supplies for issuing work permits to minors. How can I order them?
A: Many of the state forms used by the Bureau of Child Labor are available on our "Forms and Publications" webpage at www.in.gov/dol/2400.htm . Please download any forms you may need from this page and print them as you need them.

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Q: Can we still use the green work permit cards (Form 898)?
A: No. The Indiana Department of Labor will no longer produce or distribute the green work permit cards. Beginning January 1, 2010, all Hoosier schools must use the Online Work Permit System to issue work permits. For training videos and text guides about using the Online Work Permit System, please visit our Forms and Publications page or e-mail the Bureau of Child Labor at childlabor@dol.in.gov .

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Q: What are Parental Permission Forms? Where can I obtain one?
A: Parental Permission Forms are provided by the Indiana Department of Labor to document extended hours that a parent has authorized a 16 or 17 year old to work. These forms should be kept with the minor's records and are subject to inspection by the Indiana Department of Labor. Written parental permission must be obtained before the minor works any extended hours. These forms may be found online at http://www.in.gov/dol/2400.htm . There is no parental permission that will change the work hour restrictions for minors under 16 years of age.

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Q: Where can I obtain an embosser/stamp for issuing Online Work Permits?
A: There should be no need to purchase new equipment. Each school should have a stamp or embossing seal on hand for the validation of official documents and transcripts. Sometimes, this may be in the Principal's office, the guidance area or the administrative offices. Please check with your school's administrators to determine where this embosser/stamp is located in your school. The Indiana Department of Labor cannot assist in ordering embossers or stamps.

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Employers

Q: Where can I get an "Intent to Employ" form?
A: The "Intent to Employ/A1" form is a form that the employer is required to complete. The school will require that this form be completed before issuing a Work Permit. This form is available online at www.in.gov/dol/2400.htm .

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Q: What are Parental Permission Forms? Where can I obtain one?
A: Parental Permission Forms are provided by the Indiana Department of Labor to document extended hours that a parent has authorized a 16 or 17 year old to work. These forms should be kept with the minor's records and are subject to inspection by the Indiana Department of Labor. Written parental permission must be obtained before the minor works any extended hours. These forms may be found online at http://www.in.gov/dol/2400.htm . There is no parental permission that will change the work hour restrictions for minors under 16 years of age.

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Q: How do I order Child Labor forms and posters for my business?
A: Many of the state forms used by the Bureau of Child Labor are available on our "Forms and Publications" webpage at www.in.gov/dol/2400.htm . Please download any forms you may need from this page and print them as you need them.

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Q: What Child Labor document(s) am I required to post in my workplace?
A: If your business employs minors, you must post the "Notice of Teen Work Hours Restrictions" poster. This poster details what hours a minor may or may not work based on age. It also references the Teen Break Law as well as addressing safety concerns for minors working late hours. This poster is available for free online at www.in.gov/dol/2400.htm .

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Parents/Students

Q: Where can I get an "Intent to Employ" form?
A: The "Intent to Employ/A1" form is a form that the employer is required to complete. The school will require that this form be completed before issuing a Work Permit. This form is available online at www.in.gov/dol/2400.htm .

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Q: What are Parental Permission Forms? Where can I obtain one?
A: Parental Permission Forms are provided by the Indiana Department of Labor to document extended hours that a parent has authorized a 16 or 17 year old to work. These forms should be kept with the minor's records and are subject to inspection by the Indiana Department of Labor. Written parental permission must be obtained before the minor works any extended hours. These forms may be found online at http://www.in.gov/dol/2400.htm . There is no parental permission that will change the work hour restrictions for minors under 16 years of age.

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Online Work Permit System

Overview

Q: What is the "Online Work Permit System?"
A: The "Online Work Permit System" is used by accredited high schools in Indiana to issue Work Permits to minors seeking employment. This system is designed to replace much of the paperwork and postage required by the old "green form" system. The system is fully automated and allows schools to issue work permits quickly and with on-hand supplies. The data included in the work permit system is an invaluable tool used frequently by the Indiana Department of Labor for compiling teen labor reports.

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Q: Can a school refuse to issue a work permit simply because the minor does not attend that school?
A: No. This is not a sufficient reason to deny a work permit. A minor must obtain a work permit from an accredited school in the school district where he/she resides. Sometimes the minor may not attend that school due to late-year transfer, homeschooling, private schooling, withdrawal, etc. The issuing school may request a copy of the minor's transcript and attendance record from his/her current or former school program to verify academic performance and attendance. If the minor's academics or attendance are not up to the school system's standards, the minor may be denied a work permit.

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Q: Can we still use the green work permit cards (Form 898)?
A: No. The Indiana Department of Labor will no longer produce or distribute the green work permit cards. Beginning January 1, 2010, all Hoosier schools must use the Online Work Permit System to issue work permits. For training videos and text guides about using the Online Work Permit System, please visit our Forms and Publications page or e-mail the Bureau of Child Labor at childlabor@dol.in.gov .

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Q: I am a homeschooling parent. Can I issue a Work Permit for my child?
A: No. Work permits are issued through accredited schools in Indiana. We typically recommend obtaining a work permit for a homeschool student through the public high school that the minor would regularly attend.

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Q: How long should a school retain a minor's work permit or Intent to Employ form after he/she terminates employment?
A: Although there is no specific law regarding how long a work permit must be kept, we recommend keeping the Work Permit on file with the minor's student records. At minimum, best practice is to keep the Work Permit for two years. Please check your school's records retention policy or speak with your school's legal counsel about how your school handles work permit records.

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Technical Issues

Q: I am an issuing officer and I have lost my user login/password. How do I request a new one?
A: The principal of the accredited school that appointed you as an issuing officer is charged with maintaining your user login and password. If the accredited school principal is unclear on how to reissue the password, he/she may refer to our Forms and Publications page for online videos and a text guide on using the Online Work Permit System.

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Q: The Online Work Permit System is down. Who do I contact?
A: For technical issues with the online work permit system, please e-mail childlabor@dol.in.gov with an explanation of the issue. We will try to quickly diagnose the issue and enlist technical assistance if necessary.

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Q: Where can I order more State Seal stickers for online work permits?
A: The Indiana Department of Labor has discontinued the use, production and shipment of the State Seal stickers. Schools should now use the embossing seal or stamp that they would typically use to validate official transcripts. This stamp or seal should be placed in the top right corner of the work permit that reads "Void Without Proper Validation." Work permits will not be considered valid without this authentication.

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Q: How long should a school retain a minor's work permit or Intent to Employ form after he/she terminates employment?
A: Although there is no specific law regarding how long a work permit must be kept, we recommend keeping the Work Permit on file with the minor's student records. At minimum, best practice is to keep the Work Permit for two years. Please check your school's records retention policy or speak with your school's legal counsel about how your school handles work permit records.

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Q: Where can I obtain an embosser/stamp for issuing Online Work Permits?
A: There should be no need to purchase new equipment. Each school should have a stamp or embossing seal on hand for the validation of official documents and transcripts. Sometimes, this may be in the Principal's office, the guidance area or the administrative offices. Please check with your school's administrators to determine where this embosser/stamp is located in your school. The Indiana Department of Labor cannot assist in ordering embossers or stamps.

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Q: Our Embossing seal/stamp will not reach the area that reads "Void Without Proper Validation." What should we do?
A: In these instances, please get the embosser/stamp as close to that box as possible. It is perfectly acceptable to turn the seal upside down to get it to fit. Especially in the case of the embossing seals, employers and our Investigators should be able to feel the indentions in the paper and be able to easily locate the seal.

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Mandatory Use

Q: Must a school use the Online Work Permit System?
A: Effective January 1, 2010, all Hoosier schools are required use the Online Work Permit System to issue work permits. For training videos and information about using the Online Work Permit System, please visit our Forms and Publications page at http://www.in.gov/dol/2400.htm or e-mail the Bureau of Child Labor at childlabor@dol.in.gov .

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Q: Can we still use the green work permit cards (Form 898)?
A: No. The Indiana Department of Labor will no longer produce or distribute the green work permit cards. Beginning January 1, 2010, all Hoosier schools must use the Online Work Permit System to issue work permits. For training videos and text guides about using the Online Work Permit System, please visit our Forms and Publications page or e-mail the Bureau of Child Labor at childlabor@dol.in.gov .

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How to Sign Up

Q: How do I sign up to use the "Online Work Permit System?"
A: The Online Work Permit System is open for use by accredited schools in the State of Indiana. Each accredited school's principal will receive a USER LOGIN and PASSWORD. The principal may then establish a User Login and Password for the school's Issuing Officer(s). If your accredited school does not yet have access to the Online Work Permit System, please contact the Bureau of Child Labor by e-mail at childlabor@dol.in.gov . If you are the principal of an accredited school and you have not received a USER LOGIN or PASSWORD, please e-mail the Bureau of Child Labor at childlabor@dol.in.gov. Please include your name, your e-mail address, your school's name, and your phone number.

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Q: I am an issuing officer and I have lost my user login/password. How do I request a new one?
A: The principal of the accredited school that appointed you as an issuing officer is charged with maintaining your user login and password. If the accredited school principal is unclear on how to reissue the password, he/she may refer to our Forms and Publications page for online videos and a text guide on using the Online Work Permit System.

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Q: I am a homeschooling parent. Can I issue a Work Permit for my child?
A: No. Work permits are issued through accredited schools in Indiana. We typically recommend obtaining a work permit for a homeschool student through the public high school that the minor would regularly attend.

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Child Labor Investigations

Procedures

Q: Will I be provided with a copy of the inspection report at the time of the investigation?
A: Unfortunately, no. The Bureau of Child Labor has discontinued using hand-written carbon paper forms and now enters all inspections on a laptop. The inspector, however, should provide you with a receipt showing the date of the inspection and giving a tally of any violations found. If the inspector finds violations, the actual report of inspection will be mailed to you 7 to 10 days after the date of inspection.

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Q: Where do I send the Termination Notice once a minor has separated from employment?
A: If a minor in your business has quit, stopped showing up or been fired, the issuing officer at the school that issued the work permit must be notified immediately and in writing. This is typically done using the Termination Notice attached to the Work Permit. Please mail, fax or hand deliver the Termination Notice back to the school that issued the work permit.

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Q: Where do I mail my payment of civil penalties?
A: You may mail all payments of civil penalties resulting from child labor investigations to:

Indiana Department of Labor
DOL Youth Fund
402 West Washington Street, Room W195
Indianapolis, Indiana 46204

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Q: How can I protest Child Labor violations?
A: The Administrative Orders and Procedures Act allows for a "Petition for Review." If you feel the violations were cited in error, this is your opportunity to let the Indiana Department of Labor know that an error may have occurred. By law, a Petition for Review must be made in writing and received by the Bureau of Child Labor within 30 days of your receipt of the notice of civil penalties. Please include documentary evidence to illustrate why you believe a mistake was made. The Bureau of Child Labor will review the circumstances and the documentary evidence, and we will issue an administrative order either upholding or eliminating the disputed violations. If a petitioner cannot provide evidence to show that an error has occurred, the petition will likely be denied.

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Q: Do child labor inspectors call to make an appointment before visiting?
A: No. Child labor inspectors have the statutory authority to inspect any Hoosier business, and will typically not make an appointment for an inspection.

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Q: My business was just inspected for child labor violations. When will we be inspected again?
A: Depending on the severity of the violations, the Indiana Department of Labor will typically re-inspect a business within one calendar year.

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Q: Someone has entered my business claiming to be from the Indiana Bureau of Child Labor. How do I know if someone is really a Child labor Inspector?
A: Indiana's Child Labor Inspectors will have the following pieces of identification that should verify his/her position:

  • a state-issued ID badge
  • a letter from the Commissioner of Labor identifying the inspector and defining his/her duties
  • credentials issued by the Indiana Department of Labor, and
  • a copy of his/her Indiana Department of Labor inspection credentials

If you have any question about the identity of an inspector, please call (317) 232-2655 for confirmation.

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Q: Are Child Labor Inspectors allowed to talk to my employees?
A: Yes. Child Labor inspectors from the Indiana Department of Labor have the statutory authority to review records, examine work areas and interview employees when conducting a Child Labor Investigation.

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Violations

Q: Where do I send the Termination Notice once a minor has separated from employment?
A: If a minor in your business has quit, stopped showing up or been fired, the issuing officer at the school that issued the work permit must be notified immediately and in writing. This is typically done using the Termination Notice attached to the Work Permit. Please mail, fax or hand deliver the Termination Notice back to the school that issued the work permit.

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Q: Will I be provided with a copy of the inspection report at the time of the investigation?
A: Unfortunately, no. The Bureau of Child Labor has discontinued using hand-written carbon paper forms and now enters all inspections on a laptop. The inspector, however, should provide you with a receipt showing the date of the inspection and giving a tally of any violations found. If the inspector finds violations, the actual report of inspection will be mailed to you 7 to 10 days after the date of inspection.

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Q: Where should a minor's Work Permit be filed?
A: The Work Permit must remain on file at the location of the minor's employment. For example, if the minor works in a restaurant, the original copy of the Work Permit must stay on file in that restaurant for the duration of the minor's employment.

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Q: What is an "A: Minors without work permits" violation?
A: Nearly all minors ages 14 through 17, even if they do not attend school in Indiana, must obtain a work permit before beginning work or participating in any training. Exceptions for this rule include minors working as:

  • farm laborers
  • domestic workers (babysitters)
  • golf caddies
  • newspaper carriers
  • performers
  • actors
  • models
  • certified sports referees, umpires or officials (see related FAQs)

If the minor has been legally emancipated, has graduated from high school (or its equivalency) or if the minor will be working for a business that is solely-owned by a parent, he/she is not required to obtain a work permit. The penalties for an "A" violation are as follows:

  • First Violation: Warning
  • Second Violation: $50
  • Third Violation: $75
  • Fourth and Subsequent Violations: $100

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Q: What is a "B: Poster not displayed" violation?
A: Indiana law requires that employers post notice of the maximum allowable hours per day, as well as the hours beginning and ending each day. This poster is developed and distributed by the Indiana Department of Labor Online at www.in.gov/dol/2400.htm. The poster may also be available, for a fee, from third-party vendors. The penalties for a "B" violation are as follows:

  • First Violation: Warning
  • Second Violation: $50
  • Third Violation: $75
  • Fourth and Subsequent Violations: $100

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Q: What is a "C: Termination notice not returned" violation?
A: The Issuing Officer of a work permit must be notified immediately and in writing of the termination of employment of a minor. This may be done using the bottom half of the Form 898 (Work Permit/Termination Notice) on file for the minor. This document may be transmitted to the issuing officer at the school that issued the work permit by mail, fax, or hand-delivery. The penalties for a "C" violation are as follows:

  • First Violation: Warning
  • Second Violation: $50
  • Third Violation: $75
  • Fourth and Subsequent Violations: $100

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Q: What is a "D: Hour violation: less than 30 minutes" violation?
A: State and Federal laws mandate acceptable work hours for minors. These hours vary based on the minor's age. A "D" violation occurs when a minor works less than 30 minutes past the legally defined deadline for the minor's age. For more frequently asked questions about hours of work, please visit the "Hours of Work" section of the Child Labor FAQs. The penalties for a "D" violation are as follows:

  • First Violation: Warning
  • Second Violation: $50
  • Third Violation: $75
  • Fourth and Subsequent Violations: $100

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Q: What is an "E: Hour violation: more than 30 minutes" violation?
A: State and Federal laws mandate acceptable work hours for minors. These hours vary based on the minor's age. A "E" violation occurs when a minor works more than 30 minutes past the legally defined deadline for the minor's age. Even 31 minutes will trigger this violation. For more frequently asked questions about hours of work, please visit the "Hours of Work" section of the Child Labor FAQs. The penalties for an "E" violation are as follows:

  • First Violation: Warning
  • Second Violation: $100
  • Third Violation: $200
  • Fourth and Subsequent Violations: $400

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Q: What is a "F: Prohibited / hazardous occupation" violation?
A: Minors are prohibited by state and federal law from working in certain occupations defined as hazardous under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). For more information on prohibited occupations, please visit the United States Department of Labor online at www.youthrules.dol.gov or see the Child Labor FAQs concerning Prohibited Occupations. The penalties for a "F" violation are as follows:

  • First Violation: Warning
  • Second Violation: $100
  • Third Violation: $200
  • Fourth and Subsequent Violations: $400

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Q: What is a "G: Under 14 years of age / illegal entertainment" violation?
A: In general, minors under the age of 14 may not work in a Hoosier business. Notable exceptions are minors under 14 employed as Farm Laborers (may not employ under 12 years old), domestic service worker, golf caddie, newspaper carrier, performers, actors and photographic models. Minors are free to work as performers, actors or photographic models at any age, as long as the activities are not detrimental to health or welfare of the minor and do not interfere with schooling (under 16 must receive equivalent to public education). A parent must accompany minor under the age of 16 to all rehearsals and performances. Minors may not perform in a cabaret, dance hall, night club, tavern, or other similar place. The penalties for a "G" violation are as follows:

  • First Violation: Warning
  • Second Violation: $100
  • Third Violation: $200
  • Fourth and Subsequent Violations: $400

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Q: What is a "H: After 7:30 a.m. and before 3:30 p.m. on school day" violation?
A: In most cases, minors may not work during “school hours” from 7:30 am to 3:30 pm on a school day. 16 and 17 year olds may work during school hours with written permission from the school. 14 and 15 year olds have no such exemptions. Minors working as actors, performers and photographic models are exempt from this requirement. The penalties for a "H" violation are as follows:

  • First Violation: Warning
  • Second Violation: $100
  • Third Violation: $200
  • Fourth and Subsequent Violations: $400

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Q: What is an "I: Six or more hours without a break" violation?
A: If a minor 14 through 17 years of age works six or more hours in a shift, the employer is required to provide the minor with one or two breaks totaling at least 30 minutes. These breaks may be taken at any point during the minor's shift. Indiana Administrative Code 610 IAC 10-3-1 requires that break logs be maintained by the employer to document all paid and unpaid breaks provided to minor employees. The penalties for an "I" violation are as follows:

  • First Violation: Warning
  • Second Violation: $100
  • Third Violation: $200
  • Fourth and Subsequent Violations: $400

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Q: What is the difference between a "D" violation (Hour violation: less than 30 minutes) and an "E" violation (Hour violation: more than 30 minutes)?
A: An hour violation occurs when a minor works past the legally allowed maximum for his or her work hours. For example, if a 14 year old works more than 3 hours on a school day, that would be an hour violation. If the 14 year old worked more than three hours but less than 3.5 hours, the violation would be a "D violation" less than 30 minutes." If the 14 year old worked more than 3.5 hours, even only one minute, it would be an "E violation: more than 30 minutes."

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Q: My business was just inspected for child labor violations. When will we be inspected again?
A: Depending on the severity of the violations, the Indiana Department of Labor will typically re-inspect a business within one calendar year.

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Q: Where do I mail my payment of civil penalties?
A: You may mail all payments of civil penalties resulting from child labor investigations to:

Indiana Department of Labor
DOL Youth Fund
402 West Washington Street, Room W195
Indianapolis, Indiana 46204

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Q: How can I protest Child Labor violations?
A: The Administrative Orders and Procedures Act allows for a "Petition for Review." If you feel the violations were cited in error, this is your opportunity to let the Indiana Department of Labor know that an error may have occurred. By law, the petitions must be in writing and received by the Bureau of Child Labor within 30 days of your receipt of the notice of civil penalties. Please include documentary evidence to illustrate where you feel a mistake was made. The Bureau of Child Labor will review the circumstances and issue an administrative order. If a petitioner cannot provide evidence to show that an error has occurred, the petition will likely be denied.

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Q: How long should an employer retain a minor's work permit after he/she terminates employment?
A: Although there is no specific law regarding how long a work permit must be kept, we recommend keeping the Work Permit on file with the minor's other employment records. At minimum, best practice is to keep the Work Permit for two years.

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