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Indiana Department of Natural Resources

Reclamation > Abandoned Mines > Partners & Programs Partners & Programs

Partners For Reclamation

Some projects are too small and financially unfeasible to be done through a state design and bidding process. These projects; however, may be very important to the landowner to be corrected

The Division of Reclamation and area Resource Conservation and Development (RC&D) Councils have joined together to provide an opportunity to help local citizens fix the adverse effects of coal mining on their property. Landowners work with their local Soil and Water Conservation District (SWCD) to develop a plan to correct the mining related problems unique to their property. Once a reclamation plan has been accepted by the county SWCD, the Division of Reclamation will review the proposed project for compliance with all applicable regulations to determine if it is appropriate for this program. Funding is available on a competitive basis, and based upon the technical and financial aspects of the individual site. If a site is selected, the Division of Reclamation will fund up to eighty-five percent of the project costs through the RC&D. The RC&D may assist the property owner with contracting and other aspects of the project

If you would like more information on this program, download the on the Partners for Reclamation Program brochure.

Reclamation Re-Leaf

The purpose of this program is to establish a healthy forest on mined land that will protect soil and water resources, provide wildlife habitat and eventually, timber production. Eligible land is limited to those acres that have been mined for coal and reclaimed after 1977 and where all bonds have been released. A minimum of ten acres is required. Funding for the Reclamation Re-Leaf Program is made available on a competitive basis through the Division of Reclamation and is coordinated through the local Resource Conservation and Development Council. There are some financial commitments required by the landowner that can be rebated over a two year maintenance care plan.

What you need to know

We offer a guide to help the public and local officials further understand potential problems associated with previously mined areas.

These problems may be associated with both underground and surface mined sites and can result in serious damage to improvements.

Previously mined land may have many attractive features for development as residential, industrial and recreational sites.

Hidden dangers such as dangerous mine openings, unstable highwalls, and unpredictable ground movement have resulted in serious damages to improvements on these sites. Additional problems can result from subsidence, mine spoils, mine impoundments, and landslides.

The Indiana Division of Reclamation always suggests obtaining assistance from a qualified engineer for specific site evaluation before you buy or build on previously mined land. A list of resources is provided at the end of this booklet for additional information.

Common problems